- The Washington Times - Monday, April 16, 2001

Bosnian Serb held in slaughter of Muslims

BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina A former Bosnian Serb army commander wanted for the slaughter of thousands of Muslims in Bosnia's worst wartime massacre at Srebrenica was arrested yesterday and is to be sent to The Hague to face trial.
Dragan Obrenovic was detained by three soldiers with the NATO-led Sfor peacekeeping force around 1 p.m. after his car was stopped in Zvornik, in the east of Bosnia.
NATO chief George Robertson said in a statement from Brussels that Mr. Obrenovic was accused of being responsible for the extermination of thousands of Bosnian Muslim males, complicity of genocide, violation of the laws and customs of war, crimes against humanity and grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 including murder, torture, and racial and religious persecutions.

375 killed during Thai New Year

BANGKOK The death toll from accidents and fights during the Thai New Year festival has risen to a record high of 375, the government said yesterday.
The National Accident Monitoring Cell said 265 persons have been killed and 15,705 persons injured in road accidents since Thursday, a day before the start of the three-day festival of Songkran.
Another 110 persons were killed and 13,672 injured in drunken brawls, electrocution, drowning and other accidents related to the festival, the accident agency said.

Fidel Castro's brother warns of U.S. attack

VARADERO, Cuba Cuba believes the United States has not abandoned the idea of a military attack on the island, the nation's defense minister said yesterday.
Because of that, Cuba is full of subterranean tunnels, some of which can hold large quantities of troops, said Gen. Raul Castro, President Fidel Castro's younger brother.

India opens dialogue in troubled Kashmir

NEW DELHI The Indian government yesterday announced the beginning of a political dialogue in Kashmir to resolve the Muslim separatist violence which has claimed more than 34,000 lives since 1989.
India's chief negotiator for Kashmir, Krishna Chandra Pant, made the announcement after sending invitations yesterday to regional groups as well as the All-Party Hurriyat Conference, an umbrella forum of some two dozen political separatist groups of Kashmir.

Australia drops Kyoto accord

CANBERRA, Australia The Australian government indicated yesterday it won't ratify the Kyoto agreement on climate change, drawing immediate criticism from a global meeting of environmental activists.
Australian Environment Minister Sen. Robert Hill said the Kyoto Protocol for reducing greenhouse gas emissions was defunct because the United States would not ratify it.

Real IRA blamed for London bombing

LONDON British anti-terrorist police said yesterday that a "totally reckless" Easter bomb attack on a London post office was the work of Irish republican guerrillas marking a key date in their movement's history.
No one was hurt in the blast, which ripped through a vacant postal center in the north of the British capital late yesterday, but police said the bomb could have seriously injured or maimed anyone passing by.

Syrian intellectuals want human rights

DAMASCUS, Syria Syrian intellectuals called for a new social contract with the government based upon the principals of human rights, to serve as a basis for a "national dialogue."
The Committees for the Reactivation of Civil Society (CRCS), in a statement distributed in Damascus yesterday, called for for respect for human rights and "the establishment of democracy allowing the people to choose their government."

30 reported killed by Colombia rightists

BOGOTA, Colombia After rightist paramilitary fighters reportedly massacred 30 people in mountain hamlets, rival guerrillas yesterday raided a separate village and killed at least one resident, the army said.

In southwestern Cauca province where the reported paramilitary massacre took place, federal human rights ombudsman Eduardo Cifuentes said he believed "about 30" villagers had been killed by the rightist United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC).

Hundreds have fled the region on the backs of mules and horses seeking refuge in the town of Timba, where they have told their stories to officials.

India opens dialogue in troubled Kashmir

NEW DELHI The Indian government yesterday announced the beginning of a political dialogue in Kashmir to resolve the Muslim separatist violence that has claimed more than 34,000 lives since 1989.

India's chief negotiator for Kashmir, Krishna Chandra Pant, made the announcement after sending invitations yesterday to regional groups as well as the All-Party Hurriyat Conference, an umbrella forum of some two dozen political separatist groups of Kashmir.


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