- The Washington Times - Monday, April 23, 2001

Delta, pilots reach tentative deal
Delta Air Lines Inc. and the union representing its 10,000 pilots reached a tentative agreement on a new contract yesterday, the National Mediation Board said.
Delta, the No. 3 U.S. airline, and the Air Line Pilots Association resumed talks with the help of the National Mediation Board last week, as they tried to hammer out a deal before a 30-day strike countdown that is due to expire Sunday.
"The agreement is subject to approval by the Delta pilots Master Executive Council and the pilot membership," the board said in announcing the deal.

Bush bashed on Earth Day

Activists, politicians and celebrities gathered for Earth Day celebrations and cleanups yesterday, but the events founder and others criticized what they fear will be a rollback of environmental progress.
"Tragically, the president doesnt have any interest at all in the issue," former Sen. Gaylord Nelson, credited with founding Earth Day in 1970, said in a speech Saturday.
Mr. Nelson criticized President Bushs decision last month to reject the Kyoto Protocol. Mr. Bush said the treaty would harm the American economy.

Officials monitor Florida blazes

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Firefighters yesterday battled wildfires across the state, with at least one blaze expected to burn for much of the week.
State officials were monitoring 64 fires and mopping up 23 others, including one that had destroyed nearly 7,000 acres and caused more than $1 million in damage in Sarasota and Charlotte counties.

Record labels lag in violence cleanup

LOS ANGELES A new federal report singles out the recording industry for doing virtually nothing to stop marketing violent materials to children, the Los Angeles Times reported yesterday.
The Federal Trade Commission report finds that the film and video game industries have made some progress but have not yet eliminated the problem, the newspaper reported.
The report, requested by the Senate Commerce Committee, will provide a preliminary review of the marketing practices of the film, movie and recording industries.

Sub skipper faces hearing today

HONOLULU The skipper of the USS Greeneville has been assured his disciplinary hearing today will be conducted "with an open mind" and expects to retire with full pension and an honorable discharge, his attorney said.
The submarine collided with a fishing boat Feb. 9, killing nine Japanese students and adults.
The commanding officer, U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Thomas Fargo, will punish Cmdr. Scott Waddle today at a hearing known as an "admirals mast." It will mean the end of Cmdr. Waddles Navy career, although he will not face the prospect of prison.

Scientists find 'sweet tooth gene

Scientists said yesterday they may have located the so-called sweet tooth gene, a finding that could lead to new artificial sweeteners.
In two separate studies, scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York pinpointed a gene in mice they believe is responsible for tasting sweetness and, with the help of the recently completed mapping of the entire human genome, were able to locate the equivalent gene in humans.

Convicted killer executed in Nevada

CARSON CITY, Nev. A convicted killer who could have stopped his execution by asking for an appeal died by injection after screaming to prison officials that he should be allowed to live.
Yelling "I killed nobody, nobody," Sebastian Stephanus Bridges, 37, was executed late Saturday for shooting Hunter Blatchford and letting him bleed to death in the desert.
Bridges could have stopped the execution at any time by saying he wanted to appeal but did not. Instead, he pleaded with prison officials to let him live, shouting, "You want to kill me like a dog."

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