- The Washington Times - Wednesday, April 25, 2001

Mad for 'Bridget'
"First came mad cow disease, then the hoof-and-mouth epidemic. Now the UK is in the grip of another heifer-related scourge — Bridget Jones mania.
"For the past month the British media has been gearing up for the release of the film and, now that its arrived, the entire female population of Britain has gone crazy about Helen Fieldings overweight alter ego! …
"The reason the British press has reluctantly come to terms with Fieldings triumph is because shes achieved success in America, the publishing equivalent of winning an Olympic gold medal… . When a British icon manages to cross the Atlantic, whether Harry Potter, Tom Jones or Bridget Jones, we feel a glow of patriotic pride.
"In order to ease the transition from local heroine to international phenomenon, Bridget Jones had to be played by an American actress. The news that Renee Zellweger landed the role was greeted with uproar over here, completely counteracting the pride we felt on learning that the book was to be made into a Hollywood film… . What was wrong with Kate Winslet, for heavens sake? It was like casting Ben Affleck as James Bond."
—Toby Young, writing on "Bridget Jonesing," in the April 17 issue of New York Press

Changing the subject

Only about 14 percent of out-of-wedlock births occur to girls under age 18.
"It is primarily a question of a crisis in the relationships of young adult men and women. For many reasons, liberals dont even want to acknowledge … that this exists, even though the entire welfare state exists in order to subsidize single parents… . But faced with data showing a growing out-of-wedlock childbearing rate, they will go off on this other little issue . And thats a very deliberate red herring so that they can keep attention off the real issue, which is the collapse of marriage and the growth of illegitimacy… .
"The reason for that is that marriage is a politically incorrect institution. They are very busy in the business of building a new family to supersede the family and marriage "
—Robert Rector, interviewed by Kathryn Jean Lopez in National Review Online at www.nationalreview.com

Familiar fear

"The Cato Institute recently joined with the NAACP and the financial scandal-ridden left-wing hate group, the Southern Poverty Law Center, in denouncing the Confederate battle flag and calling for its eradication from public spaces. In an April 16 article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Catos executive vice president David Boaz argued that the last state to include the battle flag in its state emblem, Mississippi, should scrap it. Comparing the flag to posters of the communist terrorist Che Guevara or 'vulgar bumper stickers, Boaz makes the untenable (and insulting) argument that the hundreds of thousands of Mississippians who favor keeping the emblem do so because they want to commemorate slavery. Anyone who disagrees with this theory, says Boaz, is a 'spin doctor of the South, in other words, a liar.
"That would have to include nearly every serious historian… .
"In his book 'What They Fought For, 1861-1865, historian James McPherson reported on his reading of more than 25,000 letters and more than 100 diaries of soldiers who fought on both sides of the War for Southern Independence and concluded that Confederate soldiers (very few of whom owned slaves) 'fought for liberty and independence from what they regarded as a tyrannical government.
"The letters and diaries of many Confederate soldiers 'bristled with the rhetoric of liberty and self government writes McPherson, and spoke of a fear of being 'subjugated and 'enslaved by a tyrannical federal government. Sound familiar?"
—Thomas J. DiLorenzo, writing on "Libertarians and the Confederate Battle Flag," Thursday at www.lewrockwell.com

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