- The Washington Times - Sunday, December 23, 2001

Mugabe hits Britain, sees manipulation
HARARE, Zimbabwe Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe accused Britain yesterday of using the Commonwealth to pursue a private agenda against its former colony and vowed to resist a threatened suspension from the group, state television reported.
The Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group (CMAG) warned Zimbabwe on Thursday that it faced suspension from the 54-nation group next month unless it stops its violent farm occupations and halts media and political intimidation.
"The Commonwealth is an organization of us all, and there should never be a situation within it when one country wants to use it as an instrument to achieve its own purposes," Mr. Mugabe said in remarks broadcast on state television.

Sri Lankan seeks India's help for peace
NEW DELHI Promising the end of his nation's civil war, Sri Lanka's prime minister arrived in the Indian capital yesterday to seek greater Indian involvement in the peace process.
The government of newly appointed Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe agreed Friday to a month-long cease-fire with Tamil Tiger rebels. The cease-fire, which is to start tomorrow, has renewed hopes of an end to Sri Lanka's 18-year insurgency.
"There is going to be peace in the island, and all of us in Sri Lanka have to work hard," Mr. Wickremesinghe was quoted as saying by Press Trust of India.

Senegal sets rites for Leopold Senghor
PARIS Former Senegalese President Leopold Senghor, who died in France on Thursday at age 95, will be buried next Saturday in Dakar, the Senegalese ambassador to Paris confirmed yesterday.
Doudou Diop said the body would be flown to the capital of the west African country on Thursday in an Air Senegal plane made available to Senghor's family by Abdoulaye Wade, the current president.
The body will be placed in the parliament buildings in Dakar the next day to allow the Senegalese people to pay their final respects.
On Saturday, there will be an official ceremony in front of the presidential palace. The former president will receive military honors as well as a tribute from Mr. Wade in the ceremony.

Romania marks Ceausescu's fall
BUCHAREST, Romania Citizens of the former Communist state marked the 12th anniversary yesterday of the uprising that overthrew dictator Nicolae Ceausescu.
Candlelight ceremonies and church services were widespread. At University Square in Bucharest, young and old gathered in front of crosses erected in the memory of demonstrators who were killed at the site by Romanian police and troops during the uprising.
Across the country, masses were celebrated in churches to remember the nearly 1,000 people who died in the revolution.

Yemeni teen-ager kills two soldiers
ADEN, Yemen A Yemeni teen-ager killed two soldiers yesterday, triggering clashes between security forces and villagers in a lawless rural province, witnesses said.
The boy was wounded when other soldiers returned fire, but it was not immediately known if the ensuing clashes caused further injuries or deaths.
Local residents said the clashes in Dhale province, some 85 miles north of the Yemeni port city of Aden, were not linked to the crackdown against suspected supporters of Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda network.

Kostunica fearful on federation
BELGRADE Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica fears a dialogue on the future of federal Yugoslavia to begin in Belgrade tomorrow might not be successful, Tanjug news agency reported.
"I do not believe there are hopes for a dialogue," Tanjug quoted Mr. Kostunica as saying yesterday to the board of his Democratic Party of Serbia.
Serbia and its junior partner Montenegro, all that is left of Yugoslavia since it collapsed into five independent states in the early 1990s, are to discuss economic, social and political issues when they begin talks tomorrow.

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