- The Washington Times - Sunday, December 9, 2001

Air Force sergeant drowns in rescue
HAMILTON, Bermuda A U.S. Air Force sergeant drowned after helping rescue a sick crew member from a Malaysian tanker near Bermuda, officials said yesterday.
Sgt. Doug Eccleston fell from an inflatable raft Friday night as he and another U.S. airman were being lowered from the tanker, having completed their mission, an Air Force spokesman said.
The raft apparently "flipped over and put them into the water," said Lt. Col. Ken Warren.
Bermuda, some 560 miles off the coast of North Carolina, lacks resources for sea rescues and relies on U.S. assistance.
Sgt. Eccleston was one of three U.S. paratroopers flown to the tanker Friday. All are based at Patrick Air Force Base near Cocoa Beach, Fla.

Cuban dissidents open Web site
HAVANA A group of Cuban economists led by a well-known opponent to President Fidel Castro's government started a Web site on Friday that it said was the first to be run by dissidents from within the communist dictatorship.
The Cuban Institute of Independent Economists said at a news conference that the site's (www.cubaicei.org) list of local dissident organizations was the most extensive available and included 132 groups numbering around 21,000 activists.
"Our objective is to open a window on a part of civil society in Cuba," said the institute's director, Martha Beatriz Roque, who was released last year after nearly three years in jail for criticizing the Castro regime.

Iraq buys oil equipment
BAGHDAD Iraq has placed orders for $1.8 billion worth of oil-related equipment over the past five years, two-thirds of which have been delivered, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Iraq said yesterday.
Iraq has taken delivery of oil-related equipment worth around $1.2 billion, while equipment worth about $500 million dollars "is still on hold," Tun Myat told at a news conference on his return from New York, where he took part in deliberations on the extension of Iraq's "oil-for-food" program with the United Nations.
The program, which went into effect in December 1996, allows Iraq to sell oil under U.N. supervision to meet the humanitarian needs of its people.

Laureates urge Suu Kyi's release
OSLO Twenty Nobel Peace Prize winners led a worldwide appeal yesterday demanding that Burma's military rulers release 1991 Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest and free 1,500 other political detainees.
The laureates, led by South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu and East Timor independence leader Jose Ramos-Horta, signed the appeal here as the highlight of a series of ceremonies held worldwide marking the 10th anniversary yesterday of her Nobel award.

North Korea 'not afraid' of war
SEOUL North Korea accused the United States yesterday of trying to start a war against the communist state, and said it will respond to war with war.
Yesterday's statement came after President Bush issued a fresh warning last week to Iraq and North Korea that there would be consequences if they produce weapons of mass destruction. Mr. Bush demanded that the North allow U.N. experts to inspect its suspected nuclear weapons program.
Mr. Bush's demand reflected an "attempt to provoke a new war of aggression against the (North), " Minju Joson, a state-run North Korean newspaper, said in a commentary.
"The Korean people and the People's Army do not want war but are not afraid of it," it said.

Sri Lanka reimposes curfew, fearing riots
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka Sri Lanka reimposed an island-wide, dusk-to-dawn curfew yesterday because of lingering worries of rioting after the country's violent general election.
Curfews across the island have been imposed intermittently since Wednesday's vote, although they have been in place almost continuously in the central part of the island, which has seen sporadic rioting over the killing of 12 supporters of an opposition Muslim party

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide