- The Washington Times - Wednesday, February 14, 2001

Space station guided by U.S. for first time

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. For the first time in its two-year existence, the International Space Station sped around Earth yesterday guided by electrical rather than rocket power and by Americans rather than Russians.
"We've reached another benchmark," said Mission Control.
There was only one problem in setting up the Destiny laboratory, delivered and installed by space shuttle Atlantis' visiting astronauts over the weekend: Destiny's carbon dioxide-removal system was not working because of a bad pump.
The eight astronauts and cosmonauts in orbit had to rely instead on the air purifiers aboard Atlantis and the Russian segments of the space station.

FEMA nominee a 'doer,' Senate panel is told

Pledging to work closely with state and local governments to respond to disasters, Joe Allbaugh assured senators yesterday that he would be a "doer" as President Bush's director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
"It's a good fit," Mr. Allbaugh said at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. "I'm a doer. I consider the agency a doing agency."
FEMA is best known as the agency that provides emergency assistance in the wake of natural disasters. Mr. Allbaugh, was chief of staff to Mr. Bush when he was governor of Texas.

Looser rules sought on morning-after pill

The morning-after emergency contraceptive pill is as safe as aspirin and should be sold on drugstore shelves without a prescription to help women prevent pregnancy, 60 medical and feminist groups will tell the government today.
The unusual petition to the Food and Drug Administration comes weeks before the maker of one morning-after pill prepares to begin FDA-sanctioned studies on its use without a doctor's help.
It also comes amid a recent groundswell of interest in the pills.
The American Medical Association urged the FDA in December to let morning-after pills be sold without doctors' prescriptions. Several European nations began following that policy in the past month.
Women can take the so-called morning-after pill up to 72 hours after sexual intercourse. The issue has nothing to do with the abortion pill RU-486, which generated great controversy when the FDA approved it last year.
Opponents say emergency contraception is an abortifacient and oppose teen access to the pills.
The FDA would not comment on the petition yesterday.

Smith says family ostracized her

HOUSTON Former stripper and Playboy Playmate Anna Nicole Smith wept on the witness stand yesterday as she told of being so ostracized by the family of her multimillionaire husband that she wasn't even told when the elderly ill man was dying.

"Everyone hated me and no one gave me a chance," she said during a fifth day of testimony in the trial over the estate of her late husband, Howard Marshall II.

She married Mr. Marshall in 1994, when she was 26 and he was 89. He died the next year.

Miss Smith, 33, along with disinherited stepson J. Howard Marshall III, sued designated heir E. Pierce Marshall over the Marshall estate.

She dropped her Texas claim after a California bankruptcy judge awarded her $475 million in a separate case, but Pierce Marshall, 61, is appealing that decision.

Hate crimes killed 17 in 1991, FBI says

Seventeen persons were murdered in 1999 hate crimes, the FBI reported yesterday.
Nine of those murders were attributed to race bias, three to bias against sexual orientation and three to prejudice based on ethnic or national origin. Two murders were motivated by religious bias.
Racial prejudice motivated more than half the 7,876 hate crimes committed in 1999 that were reported to the FBI, the bureau said, while 1,411 incidents resulted from religious bias and 1,317 involved victims targeted because of sexual orientation.

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