- The Washington Times - Sunday, February 4, 2001

Books

• "Vitamins for Dummies," by Christopher Hobbs and Elson Haas, IDG Books, 1999. This is an easy-to-read reference about vitamins and minerals.

• "Nutraceuticals: The Complete Encyclopedia of Supplements, Herbs, Vitamins and Healing Foods," by Arthur Roberts and Mary O'Brien, Perigee Books, 2001. This book, published in conjunction with the American Nutraceutical Association, gives complete information on the effects of various vitamins, minerals and herbs.

• "The Health Professional's Guide to Popular Dietary Supplements," by Allison Sarubin, the American Dietetic Association, 2000. This book is aimed primarily at nutritionists but is full of scientific information.

• "The Doctor's Complete Guide to Vitamins and Minerals," by Mary Dan Eades, Dell Publishing, 2000. The innovator of the "Protein Power" diet offers more general nutrition advice in this book.

Associations

• American Dietetic Association, 216 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Ill. 60606. Phone: 800/366-1655. Web site: www.eatright.org. This professional association has a position statement on vitamin supplements as well as fact sheets, articles and books on the subject.

• FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, 200 C St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20204. Phone: 800/FDA-4010. Web site: https://vm.cfsan.fda.gov. FDA regulations on vitamins and supplements are available.

On line

• To see the recently updated RDA (recommended daily allowance) information from the National Academy of Science, go to www4.nationalacademies.org.

• The Tufts University Nutrition Navigator (https://navigator.tufts.edu) can lead visitors to other nutrition Web sites.

• The American Council on Science and Health (www.ACSH.org), a consortium of scientists and physicians, has readings, research and recommendations about vitamins and nutrition on its Web site.

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