- The Washington Times - Monday, February 5, 2001

Palestinians condemn Israeli bulldozing

GAZA CITY Israeli army bulldozers demolished six Palestinian houses, a concrete factory, two gas stations and orchards in the Gaza Strip yesterday, witnesses said.

The army said it had conducted "engineering" work "to prevent further attacks against Israeli soldiers and civilians from the area" after soldiers foiled a roadside bomb attack on Saturday.

The Palestinian Authority condemned what it said was an army incursion into areas officially under full Palestinian control. Witnesses said the operation took place on a main road near the Netzarim Jewish settlement.

Malaysia to tackle foreign media

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia The Malaysian government will form a committee to counter inaccurate reports in the foreign media, the information minister said yesterday.

Khalil Yaakob said the foreign media seemed to have preconceived notions about Malaysia and was envious of the country.

Mr. Khalil was commenting on Prime Minister Mahathir's criticism of the Hong Kong-based Asiaweek magazine for what he claimed was an attempt to make him look foolish and worn out in a profile published Jan. 26.

Quiet 12th birthday for AIDS activist

JOHANNESBURG South Africa's youngest AIDS activist turned 12 yesterday but was too ill to attend his birthday party because the disease has left him unable to eat or speak.

Nkosi Johnson championed the cause of young HIV and AIDS sufferers and spoke openly about the disease, which remains heavily stigmatized in South Africa even though about 10 percent of the country's 45 million people are HIV-positive.

Nkosi, the longest-surviving child born with the disease in South Africa, collapsed in December with AIDS-related brain damage and viral infections. He was hospitalized, but doctors said they could do nothing more for him. He was not expected to live much longer and was taken home to be more comfortable.

Milosevic 'feels unsafe' as investigation opens

BELGRADE Slobodan Milosevic has admitted that he and his family feel "threatened and unsafe" as Serbia's government prepares to open a formal investigation of the former Yugoslav president that may lead to his indictment.

In an interview with an Italian newspaper, Mr. Milosevic described the tribunal in The Hague, which has indicted him for war crimes, as "an immoral and illegal institution." Unrepentant, he blamed "external pressure" for his party's poor showing in December's parliamentary elections.

Thousands reject guerrilla enclave

BOGOTA, Colombia Thousands of Colombians rejected the creation of a second guerrilla stronghold during a protest yesterday in what would be the main town inside the enclave in northern Colombia.

The protest came as the government was close to granting a 1,860-square-mile territory to the leftist National Liberation Army, or ELN. The guerrilla army has demanded the demilitarized zone as an exchange for peace talks with the government.

During the peaceful demonstration yesterday, some 12,000 people filled the streets of San Pablo to oppose the plan.

World Economic Forum systems hacked

ZURICH Anti-globalization computer hackers have infiltrated the computer systems of the World Economic Forum and stolen personal information of most of the participants in the Forum's recent annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, forum spokesmen have confirmed.

The attack was first reported yesterday by the Swiss newspaper SonntagsZeitung. The paper says it has received anonymously, but clearly from the forum's opponents a compact disc containing 161 megabytes of data apparently copied from the forum's own Web server.

The disc is said to include a list of 27,000 names, some of which are paired with data such as e-mail addresses and phone numbers; another list of 1,400 credit card numbers and names; and spreadsheets detailing the travel schedules, hotel accommodations, session registrations and payments, and Web site passwords of all the 3,200 participants in the Jan. 25-30 meeting.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide