- The Washington Times - Monday, January 1, 2001

Dueling newspapers

A third opinion

The Los Angeles Times editorial page not known as being particularly friendly to conservatives appears to side with the New York Times, rather than The Washington Post (see item above), in assessing George W. Bush's Cabinet picks so far.

"Overall, Bush's Cabinet choices appear to signal an administration that is likely to be more pragmatic than ideological," the California newspaper said yesterday.

Too late now

No commission, please

Senate Democratic leader Tom Daschle, when asked yesterday whether he supports Senate Republican leader Trent Lott's proposal for a Social Security reform commission headed by Democrat Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Republican Bob Dole, said he preferred to see the Senate act on its own.

"I don't know that we need another commission, per se," Mr. Daschle said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"I think that the Congress ought to take the bull by the horns and deal with it. We've had a lot of commissions, but if you're going to have one, I can't think of two better people to lead it" than Mr. Moynihan and Mr. Dole, the South Dakota senator added.

'A nice man'

The buck stops there

Huckabee's request

"Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee campaigned tirelessly for fellow Republican George W. Bush, helping him carry Bill Clinton's state in the election. Now he's looking for payback," Richard J. Newman writes in U.S. News & World Report.

"A plum administration job? Nope. Huckabee's angling for a gig for his rock-and-roll band, Capitol Offense, at the inaugural festivities in Washington. The governor, who plays bass, evidently plans to keep his day job. He has told the Bushies that playing a small party would satisfy his stage envy."


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