- The Washington Times - Tuesday, January 2, 2001

Kenyan jet attacker paranoid, doctor says

NAIROBI, Kenya A Kenyan student who burst into the cockpit of a British Airways jumbo jet and attacked the pilots, causing the plane to plunge, is suffering from acute paranoia and was not trying to harm anyone, doctors said yesterday.

Paul Kefa Mukonyi, 27, had been suffering from paranoia since November and dashed into the Boeing 747-400's cockpit on Friday because he felt threatened by other passengers, said Dr. Frank Njenga, a consulting psychiatrist at Nairobi Hospital. The plane was carrying 398 passengers and crew.

The Kenya-bound flight from London's Gatwick Airport survived two violent nose dives over Sudan after Mr. Mukonyi burst into the cockpit and struggled with the co-pilot.

Suu Kyi remains under house arrest

BANGKOK Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi spent her 101st consecutive day under virtual house arrest as the new year began yesterday, despite promises by the military government to release her.

Mrs. Suu Kyi was confined to her Rangoon home on Sept. 22 after she defied government restrictions on her movement and tried to travel by train to the northern city of Mandalay to visit members of her embattled National League for Democracy.

A Burmese government spokesman contacted in Rangoon would give no clues yesterday about when Mrs. Suu Kyi would be freed, saying he "would not like to speculate on this issue at this stage."

Church-attack suspects say God sent them

CASTRIES, St. Lucia Two men who attacked worshippers in a cathedral on this small Caribbean island, setting them ablaze and killing an Irish nun, told police they were sent by God to combat corruption in the Roman Catholic Church.

"The way they're talking is that the world is going to end and that the time had come for what they had to do," police Inspector Gregory Montoute, who interrogated the men, said yesterday.

The suspects 20-year-old Kim John, and 34-year-old Francis Phillip both identified themselves as Rastafarians, Mr. Montoute said.

Bombs explode outside two Tajikistan churches

DUSHANBE, Tajikistan Bombs damaged two more churches in the Central Asian country of Tajikistan, where a church bombing killed seven persons in October, an official said yesterday.

One bomb on Sunday evening destroyed two auxiliary buildings at the Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas in the capital, Dushanbe, said a spokesman for the Interior Ministry. The blast also blew out windows in the Sunday school and baptistery.

Another bomb Sunday destroyed windows at a Seventh-day Adventist church, the spokesman said. No one was hurt.

Ethnic Albanian rebels free detained Serbs

PRISTINA, Yugoslavia Ethnic Albanian guerrillas yesterday freed six Serbs detained near the Kosovo-Serbia border, relieving the latest source of tension in the volatile area.

"Six Serbs have been handed over to the ICRC mission an hour and a half ago, and we are bringing them back to their families," Alain Colly, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross mission in Kosovo, told Reuters.

Nebojsa Covic, head of the Yugoslav government's coordination body for the area, said later that all six were unharmed and had returned to the Kosovo village of Silovo, where they came from, Beta news agency reported.

Nepal paralyzed by general strike

KATMANDU, Nepal A general strike called by communist parties to protest four deaths during last week's rioting shut down the country yesterday, leaving businesses and schools closed and vehicles off the road.

Two persons were killed Sunday in the southern town of Rajbiraj, 150 miles southeast of Katmandu, when police fired at a crowd of demonstrators protesting the recent violence, the Katmandu Post newspaper reported.


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