- The Washington Times - Saturday, July 28, 2001

Investigators in the disappearance of Chandra Levy interviewed Rep. Gary A. Condit for the fourth time Thursday night, D.C. police confirmed yesterday.
The meeting was to provide FBI Special Agent Melissa Thomas, a profile specialist, information Mr. Condit, California Democrat, had about Miss Levy's state of mind prior to her disappearance after May 1.
Marina Ein, spokeswoman for Mr. Condit, said in a statement the FBI was questioning him to compile a detailed profile of Miss Levy.
"Congressman Condit answered every question and provided all the information and opinions that he had, " the statement read.
Mr. Condit, 53 and married, has admitted to detectives that he had an affair with Miss Levy before she disappeared. They were expected to question him further about the relationship and whether she was distraught.
Miss Levy, 24, was planning to return home to Modesto, Calif., after the end of her internship with the federal Bureau of Prisons. She was last seen April 30 when she canceled her health club membership, but police believe she was surfing the Internet on her computer on May 1.
Her parents called police on May 6 after they could not contact her. When police searched her apartment on 21st Street NW, they found her bag packed and her money and credit cards inside the efficiency apartment. There were no signs of a struggle and only Miss Levy and her keys were missing.
Police said they are trying to determine whether Miss Levy could have committed suicide because Mr. Condit broke off the affair.
Thursday's interview was held at the office of Abbe Lowell, the attorney Mr. Condit hired about a month ago when detectives wanted to first question Mr. Condit about his relationship with Miss Levy. Mr. Condit had first denied a romance, but during the third interview with investigators, he admitted an affair.
Mr. Lowell had tried negotiating with the FBI to interview Mr. Condit without D.C. police detectives, but the idea was rejected. D.C. police are the lead agency investigating Miss Levy's disappearance and the FBI is assisting.
Police officials yesterday also again dismissed a tabloid news report that Mr. Condit's wife, Carolyn, had a confrontational telephone conversation with Miss Levy before she vanished.
Mr. Condit's conduct, meanwhile, has convinced one congressman that the House ethics policy should be amended to ban fraternization between interns and members of Congress. Rep. Scott McInnis, Colorado Republican, requested the change yesterday in a letter to the House Standards of Official Conduct Committee.
"He has crossed the line and we have got to have enough gumption to stand up and say, enough is enough, " Mr. McInnis said on CNN's "Wolf Blitzer Reports."
The addendum, dubbed the "Condit clause," would include the word intern to an existing rule that forbids relations with House pages.
The page rule was enacted in 1983 after Reps. Daniel B. Crane, Illinois Republican, and Gerry E. Studds, Massachusetts Democrat, were censured by the House for having sexual relations with pages. Mr. Crane acknowledged the affair with a 17-year-old female page in 1980, and Mr. Studds admitted having sex with a 17-year-old male page in 1973.
Mr. McInnis is also considering a formal ethics complaint against Michael Dayton, Mr. Condit's chief of staff, based on reports he urged another witness not to cooperate with law enforcement officials.
FBI agents have also interviewed Joleen McKay, a former staffer of Mr. Condit's who told USA Today she had an affair with the congressman. Mrs. McKay of San Francisco told the newspaper that Mr. Dayton urged her not to cooperate with police. Mr. Dayton denied Mrs. McKay's charges.
The Washington Times reported on July 4 that a police source said five other woman have told police they had relationships with Mr. Condit.

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