- The Washington Times - Wednesday, July 4, 2001

Chimpanzees face threats in Africa
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania — Commercial hunters abetted by wars and logging companies are grave threats to chimpanzees across central Africa, renowned chimp conservationist Jane Goodall said yesterday.
"The hunters are now able to go deep into the forest because they ride on the logging trucks on the roads that have been built by the logging companies," Miss Goodall told a news conference. Chaos and armed conflict in central Africa have made it difficult to enforce laws protecting the animals, she said.
Hunters shoot chimpanzees and then smoke and sell the meat, "even shipping it off to exotic restaurants," said Miss Goodall, who has been studying chimpanzees in northwestern Tanzania for 40 years.

Austria drops charges against Haider
VIENNA — Austria's public prosecutor has decided not to press charges of incitement to racial hatred against Jorg Haider, the former leader of the far-Right Freedom Party, over his infamous "dirty Jew" speech.
The Justice Ministry denied yesterday that Justice Minister Dieter Bohmdorfer, who was appointed by the Freedom Party, had influenced the decision.
The case stemmed from a complaint of anti-Semitism brought by the leader of Austria's Jewish community, Ariel Muzicant.
At a party meeting on Ash Wednesday, Mr. Haider told cheering supporters that he could not understand how someone called Ariel could have so much dirt sticking to him. Mr. Haider claimed that it was a pun on a washing powder brand.

Cypriots step up British base protests
AKROTIRI BASE, Cyprus — Violent protests at British military bases on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus spread late yesterday as demonstrators pelted soldiers with sticks and stones over the arrest of a local member of parliament.
Troops in riot gear faced an angry crowd of Greek Cypriots at the western base of Akrotiri as a row grew over the erection of huge telecommunications masts.
Earlier, Greek Cypriots burst into a British police station at a military compound on the south of the island, demanding the release of the member of parliament, who had been arrested for trying to break into Akrotiri Royal Air Force Base.

Huge rose garden to honor Diana
LONDON — British flower enthusiasts are planning to create what they say will be the world's largest rose garden to honor the late Princess Diana, they announced yesterday.
The 5-acre garden, expected to cost $28 million, will open in 2003 as part of the planned 50-acre Royal National Rose Garden in St. Albans, a London suburb.
"This will be the people's garden for the people's princess and will be a fitting and lasting tribute to England's rose," said Ken Grapes, director general of the Royal National Rose Society, which is creating the garden.

Slavs, Albanians confer in Macedonia
SKOPJE, Macedonia — Leaders across Macedonia's ethnic divide restarted peace talks yesterday with help from Western envoys, but progress appeared likely to be difficult after an Albanian guerrilla ambush killed a Macedonian soldier.
U.S. envoy James Pardew and his European Union counterpart, Francois Leotard, joined the cross-party session in parliament after holding two days of separate crisis talks with politicians to kick-start efforts to avert a civil war with dialogue.

Venezuela asserts control of island
CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuela will call in Caribbean Community ambassadors accredited here to underscore its sovereignty over Aves Island amid reported diplomatic tension over the issue, Foreign Minister Luis Alfonso Davila said yesterday.
"With regard to the position that some of the [Caribbean Community] countries may have taken as regards this island, the Foreign Ministry will be in contact with these ambassadors to explain formally Venezuela's position," Mr. Davila said.

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