- The Washington Times - Tuesday, May 29, 2001

Adolph gains force off Mexican coast
MEXICO CITY — The first hurricane of the season turned into a whopper yesterday, roaring off of Mexicos southern Pacific coast with some of the strongest winds ever recorded in a May hurricane in the region.
Hurricane Adolph was about 165 miles south-southwest of the resort of Acapulco, and was heading northwest. It had sustained winds of almost 125 mph, and the U.S. National Hurricane Center said it could strengthen.
The center said that by some measurements, Adolph is the strongest May hurricane on record in the eastern north Pacific basin, though it cautioned that some of the measurements are uncertain.

Thousands evacuated as cyclone nears India
AHMADABAD, India — Thousands of people were evacuated yesterday as a cyclone headed toward Pakistan and western India, officials said.
The storm is expected to hit land today near the Indian town of Dwarka in Gujarat state, about 235 miles southwest of the state capital of Ahmadabad.
The storm had lost some power and was expected to cause less damage than earlier feared, said R.K. Kankane, director of the meteorological department in Ahmadabad.
The storm comes as Gujarat continues to recover from a 7.7 magnitude earthquake on Jan. 26 that left thousands homeless. Many of them are still living in temporary shelters that might not be strong enough to withstand a cyclone, officials said.

Russia reveals nuclear-waste dump
OSLO — Russias Northern Fleet opened a secret nuclear-waste dump in the arctic to outside inspection for the first time yesterday, after years of pressure from its smaller neighbor, Norway.
A Norwegian delegation led by Deputy Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide was allowed into the Andreeva Bay base, where tons of highly radioactive waste are stored roughly 30 miles from the Russian-Norwegian border.
Andreeva Bay is considered one of the worlds most radioactively dangerous places. There are more than 100 nuclear submarines at Russians Northern Fleet bases on the Kola Peninsula, where northwestern Russia borders Norway.
Most are rusted hulks, often with nuclear fuel on board, according to Bellona, a Norwegian environmental group that specializes in the issue. The waste at Andreeva includes spent nuclear fuel cores from atomic submarines. A 1996 report by Bellona said about 21,000 spent nuclear fuel assemblies are stored here, and many of the containers are leaking.

Archaeologists discover Mayan kings tomb
RUINAS DE COPAN, Honduras — Archaeologists said they have uncovered the remains of one of the 16 kings of an ancient Mayan empire, clad in jade breastplates in a tomb decorated with symbols of his power.
The recently discovered remains are the sixth found since 1943 of the 16 Mayan kings who ruled over Copan during its golden age from the years 420 to 820.
"The royal tomb is here," said Fernando Lopez, assistant to Japanese archaeologist Seiichi Nakamura, director of the Program for Conservation of Copan, located 125 miles west of Tegucigalpa.

Yodeling pooch wins Crufts dog show
LONDON — A yodeling dog won Britains famous Crufts dog show yesterday. The winning pooch was a 2-year-old Basenji — the worlds only breed with a yodel instead of a bark.
The exotically named winner, Jethard Cidevant, owned by Paul Singleton, of Colchester, Essex, beat 20,000 others to win the coveted Best in Show title at the National Exhibition Center in Birmingham.
It is the first time a Basenji has won the top prize, according to a spokesman for the organizers, the Kennel Club. The tan African hunting dog has a distinctive wrinkled brow, a tightly curled tail and a gazelle-like stance.
This years event was the first time Crufts had allowed foreign dogs to compete for the prized title in its more-than-100-year history.


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