- The Washington Times - Tuesday, November 13, 2001

Report of Air Force, Navy wrangling misses the mark

Today, as brave sailors, airmen, soldiers and Marines are fighting side by side to defeat the scourge of terrorism, your readers are entitled to the facts. Your Nov. 7 tale of interservice wrangling missed the mark ("Air Force slow to transfer special bomb kits to Navy"). In fact, the U.S. Navy and Air Force are working more closely and cooperatively than ever before to support our commander in chief in Operation Enduring Freedom.
Since 1999, more than 10,000 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) kits have been delivered to the Air Force and Navy. As the lead military service for the JDAM program, the Air Force has provided the precision laser guidance kits to all services in response to the needs of the forces in the field. Kits are being delivered today to replenish Navy stockpiles, and just last month, the Air Force let a contract to produce about 430 new JDAM kits for the Navy. The Air Force has requested that overall JDAM production be increased to meet expected requirements.
As to air operations over Afghanistan, our forces are configured to fit mission objectives and military realities. Each campaign is fought differently, and regional commanders are provided with both land- and sea-based systems to get the job done. Navy and Air Force aircraft are jointly striking al Qaeda and Taliban targets in Afghanistan. To portray it differently demeans the extraordinary courage and dedication shown by all Americans in harm's way over Afghanistan.

GEN. JOHN P. JUMPER, USAF
Chief of staff
ADM. VERN CLARK, USN
Chief of naval operations

Reports of Oxford anti-Americanism elicit sympathy for Chelsea

Although it usually is impossible to defend the Clintons, your Nov. 10 story "Details of 'terror day tale' pit Hillary vs. Chelsea" was far too uncritically accepting of the views of the BBC and Oxford students. Chelsea Clinton almost certainly has been subjected to a substantial dose of anti-American sentiment. You must live among European intellectuals to appreciate the extraordinary smugness of their common anti-Americanism. I have heard repeatedly, for example, the charge that the anthrax scares are the work of secret forces in the Bush administration determined to build up world sympathy. Yet the same intellectuals who make that charge will vehemently deny they are in any way anti-American, because they are smugly above such ideological responses.
After a decade of living and working among European intellectuals, I am certain Miss Clinton was subjected regularly to this sort of infantile anti-Americanism parading as serious thought, enough that she even has my sympathy.

WILLIAM SJOSTROM
County Cork, Ireland

EU can't admit Cyprus without consent of Turkish Cypriots

Your Nov. 8 Embassy Row column incompletely explains the European Union's consideration of membership for Cyprus as a whole with only the consent of the Greek Cypriot administration.
Greek Cypriots exercise sovereignty only over the southern portion of the island. Their leader, Glafcos Clerides, has confessed openly that his writ does not reach the territory of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC). Thus, under international law, he cannot apply to the European Union to admit all of Cyprus. Furthermore, the 1960 constitution of the partnership Republic of Cyprus and companion treaties prohibited union of Cyprus with any other sovereign, either individual or collective, whether economically, politically, or in any other way not, at least, without an amendment or the consensus of all parties concerned.
The Turkish-Cypriot people are not against joining the European Union, but logically, this should happen only after a final settlement of the Cyprus issue. Indeed, most EU member countries similarly have voiced concern about a premature admission of Cyprus while the relationship between the south and north remains in a legal and political quagmire.
President Rauf Denktash of the TRNC has persistently pursued meetings, direct and indirect talks and other communications with Mr. Clerides on the basis of political equality recognized by the United Nations Security Council. The proposed agenda would include a confederation and future ties between the Greek Cypriot administration and the TRNC. Mr. Clerides, however, has sneered at these overtures and remained mute. On Nov. 6, Mr. Denktash sent yet another letter inviting Mr. Clerides to join him at a face-to-face meeting in Nicosia. His invitation unfortunately was rejected out of hand by the Greek Cypriot leader.
Unilateral Greek Cypriot admission to the European Union will only harden the intransigence of the Greek Cypriot side. It will make the Greek Cypriots believe time is on their side and that they could threaten Turkey's EU candidacy if the TRNC does not submit to all of their extravagant demands.

AHMET ERDENGIZ
Washington representative
Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus
Washington

Story about Clinton Georgetown speech lacked objectivity

In reference to your Nov. 8 story "Clinton calls terror a U.S. debt to past," the Georgetown University Lecture Fund would like to offer the following response.
The Georgetown University Lecture Fund is a nonpartisan, student-run organization dedicated to bringing speakers who offer diverse perspectives on a broad range of topics. In light of the events of September 11, former President Bill Clinton was invited to campus to share his views with the Georgetown community. Your story both misrepresented factual aspects of the event and misinterpreted Mr. Clinton's remarks.
After examining other news articles regarding Mr. Clinton's address, we find it compelling that your article shows a markedly different focus and interpretation than stories from sources such as the Associated Press.
Mr. Clinton delivered a patriotic address delineating the history of terrorism, encouraging us to remain centered and emphasizing the crucial role of democracy and freedom in establishing a foundation for international peace. Furthermore, he called on Americans to support the Bush administration's efforts to bring the perpetrators of the September 11 attacks to justice. In the present context of a national need for unity, your at times irrelevant commentary pertaining to Mr. Clinton's character only hinders this healing process and compromises the appearance of journalistic objectivity.
We hope your readers will visit the Georgetown University Web site, watch the address in its entirety and objectively evaluate Mr. Clinton's remarks.

BRIAN MCCABE
Chairman
ANDREW M. KONESCHUSKY
Vice Chair for External Affairs
The Georgetown University Lecture Fund
Washington


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