- The Washington Times - Monday, November 19, 2001

Thousands protest at ex-Army school
COLUMBUS, Ga. Thousands of demonstrators marched outside Fort Benning yesterday to protest a former Army school they said was responsible for human rights violations against Latin-American civilians.
During the annual march to the front gate of the post, protesters carried signs reading "Imperialist Assassins." The School of the Americas, which was a training center for Latin-American soldiers, closed in December.
About 40 people were taken into custody after they slipped through an opening in a fence and onto base property. The crowd was estimated by police at 6,000 to 7,000.

Palm Beach auctions voting machines
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. Collectors from around the world logged onto an Internet auction to grab 519 of Palm Beach County's Votomatics, the voting machines that were at the heart of the 2000 presidential election controversy.
The county offered 3,594 of the machines on EBay. The fate of the leftovers was unclear.
Shoppers from as far away as England and Antarctica submitted winning bids during the 10-day auction that ended Saturday, said Brad Merriman, an assistant county administrator who oversaw the sale.
Money raised will help pay for new touch-screen voting machines. The $14 million system should be operational for an election this February, said county Elections Supervisor Theresa LePore.

Gay Lutheran pastor named in Key West
KEY WEST, Fla. A congregation has installed the first actively homosexual Lutheran pastor in Florida.
Arlo David Peterson was named pastor of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church on Nov. 11, although unmarried people, including homosexuals, are allowed to be Lutheran pastors only if they vow to remain celibate.
"I've lived in the closet most of my life, but I came to Key West for the sake of my relationship," said Mr. Peterson, who was a Lutheran pastor for more than 20 years in New York and was named adjunct pastor at Holy Trinity in August 1999. "Being gay is not an issue here."

Web site targets Columbine father
LITTLETON, Colo. A "Wanted" poster on the Web site of the Tyranny Response Team, a Colorado group opposed to gun control, targets gun-control activist Tom Mauser, Scripps Howard News Service reports.
His 15-year-old son, Daniel, was shot and killed during the April 20, 1999, Columbine High School shootings, which left 15 dead, including the two gunmen, and more than 20 injured.
The Web site features Mr. Mauser on a poster declaring, "Wanted: For Crimes Against American Civil Liberties." It describes Mr. Mauser as "unstable" and "a danger to himself and his community."
The site also accuses Mr. Mauser of "profiting from the tragic death of his son at Columbine" and making "thousands of dollars off memorial scams" and "conspiring with fanatical Nazi-style groups."

Lockheed, TRW get satellite order
Lockheed Martin Corp. and TRW Inc. have been awarded a $2.7 billion contract to develop and deliver the U.S. military's next-generation communications satellite system, the Air Force said.
Boeing Co., which had been part of the system's design team, said over the weekend it had pulled out as a TRW subcontractor because of what it described as an unacceptable risk-reward ratio.
In awarding the contract after the close of markets Friday, the Air Force said the Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite system would have 10 times the capacity of the Milstar system it was designed to replace.
The first of two satellites under the new contract is scheduled for launch in 2006. When completed in December 2011, the system will consist of four cross-linked satellites in geosynchronous orbit capable of covering regional and global military operations. A fifth satellite is to be an orbiting spare


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide