- The Washington Times - Monday, November 26, 2001

Opposition claims win in Honduras vote
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras Businessman Ricardo Maduro, candidate for the opposition National Party, declared victory in yesterday's presidential vote in Honduras, besting Rafael Pineda from the governing Liberal Party.
Although no official results were yet available, party and news media exit polls showed that Mr. Maduro trounced Mr. Pineda by a double-digit margin. One of the country's main radio stations, Radio America, said Mr. Maduro had 55 percent of the votes, against 41 percent for Mr. Pineda.
The campaign had centered on issues of corruption, crime and poverty in the Central American country.

India, Pakistan set peace talks
NEW DELHI Leaders of rivals India and Pakistan likely will hold peace talks on the sidelines of an Asian summit in January, the two countries said over the weekend.
The seven-nation gathering in Nepal will be the first meeting between Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf since a failed summit in July in India.
Tensions have spiraled in recent years over the territorial dispute in Kashmir, the focus of five decades of hostility between the two nuclear-armed neighbors.
India controls two-thirds of Kashmir and Pakistan the rest. Both sides claim the entire territory.
Pakistan is the Bush administration's ally in its war against the Taliban and Osama bin Laden, the main suspect in the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States.
But India calls Pakistan a major supporter of terrorists in the region and is upset that Washington is siding with it.

Russian minister eyes bigger NATO role
MOSCOW Russia hopes to build a partnership with NATO that would give it an equal voice on key issues with other members of the alliance, Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said in an interview broadcast yesterday.
Mr. Ivanov told RTR state television after NATO Secretary-General George Robertson's visit to Moscow last week that any arrangement to upgrade Moscow's relations with NATO implied that the opinions of all participants would be taken into account.
But he said Moscow would not use any body replacing the existing NATO-Russia forum to "torpedo" NATO activities.

Former Kosovo guerrilla arrested over kidnapping
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia International police have arrested a local ethnic Albanian commander of the Kosovo Protection Corps suspected of involvement in kidnapping five Serbs in the province in 1999, a U.N. official said yesterday.
U.N. police detained the suspect, a former local commander of the guerrilla Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) in the central town of Vucitrn, Saturday morning.
The kidnappings took place in June 1999, shortly before NATO peacekeepers and the United Nations took charge of the Yugoslav province, according to the charges.
Serbs have been the targets of numerous reprisals by ethnic Albanians since Kosovo came under international rule.

Nepal eyes crackdown on Maoist rebels
KATHMANDU, Nepal Nepal's ruling party called for tough army action to crack down on Maoists yesterday after the rebels killed at least 45 persons in weekend attacks that ended a 4-month-old truce.
A top government official said police in Kathmandu had detained a senior leader and some followers of the Maoists, who began their rebellion five years ago and wanted to topple the constitutional monarchy and set up a republic.
The wave of rebel attacks in the Himalayan kingdom began late Friday and more violence was reported yesterday, when three persons died in a bomb blast in the eastern town of Itahari.
Party officials said the army might be mobilized to crush the guerrillas. Nepal so far has used mainly police to fight the rebellion, which has claimed more than 1,850 lives


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