- The Washington Times - Monday, November 5, 2001

Passenger grabs wheel, sends bus crashing
PHOENIX A Greyhound passenger angry that he wasn't allowed to smoke scuffled with the driver while the bus was traveling 70 mph, causing it to crash.
The wreck injured 33 persons, one critically.
Charles George of Phoenix was taken into custody and charged with 37 counts of aggravated assault.
The bus was traveling from Los Angeles to Miami. The passenger was smoking a cigarette and became upset when told he couldn't smoke. The man grabbed the steering wheel and tried to take control of the bus.

Papers say CIA tried to build bionic cat
The CIA tried to uncover the Kremlin's deepest secrets during the 1960s by turning cats into walking bugging devices, according to recently declassified documents from the CIA's Science and Technology Directorate.
In one experiment a cat, dubbed Acoustic Kitty, was wired for use as an eavesdropping platform. It was hoped that the animal could listen to secret conversations from window ledges, park benches or garbage cans.
Victor Marchetti, a former CIA officer, said that Project Acoustic Kitty was a gruesome $16 million creation.
"They slit the cat open, put batteries in him, wired him up. The tail was used as an antenna," he said. "They found he would walk off the job when he got hungry, so they put another wire in to override that."
Mr. Marchetti said that the first live trial was an expensive disaster. "They took it out to a park and put him out of the van, and a taxi comes and runs him over," he said.

Bush gives wife birthday party
President Bush planned to celebrate his wife, Laura's, 55th birthday yesterday with a small group of family and friends, including Barbara Bush, the president's mother, who returned from Camp David with the couple, but not his father, former President George Bush.
Returning to the White House after a weekend at the Camp David presidential retreat, Mr. Bush emerged from his helicopter and jokingly told a bank of television cameras, photographers and journalists he was giving his wife a surprise party.
"Whatever you do, don't tell Laura about the surprise party I'm giving her today," he said, his wife a few steps behind him. "Don't tell anybody."

Health workers vaccinated against smallpox
ATLANTA The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has vaccinated some of its health workers against smallpox as a precaution in case they need to investigate a terrorist attack involving the deadly virus, a spokesman said yesterday.
While the CDC has no evidence that anyone is readying a terrorist attack using smallpox, which was eradicated outside laboratories 21 years ago, officials of the federal agency say the virus is so dangerous that it is important they be prepared.
"We are putting together several teams that could be quickly dispatched to the field if we did see a suspected case of smallpox," CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said yesterday.

Palo Alto to pull plug on laptops
PALO ALTO, Calif. A controversial program asking parents at a local middle school to buy $2,000 laptops for their sixth-graders has been formally put on hold after scores of parents complained that it wasn't fair to youngsters whose families can't afford them, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.
Bob Golton, acting superintendent of schools for Palo Alto, said he plans to name an advisory group to study the program, directed at sixth-graders at Jordan Middle School, before moving ahead.
Although school officials took pains to point out that the purchase of the Apple iBook laptops and the complementary software was "optional," many parents worried that the program set up a digital divide between the haves and the have-nots.
Parents also said they had concerns about the added weight in backpacks.


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