- The Washington Times - Thursday, October 18, 2001

U.S. has no plans to lift China sanctions
A senior State Department official yesterday dismissed as "very inaccurate" a news report that Washington was considering lifting restrictions on sale of military equipment to China as part of efforts to enlist support for the war on international terrorism.
The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, described the report as "very inaccurate and incorrect."
The newspaper said the proposed lifting of the sanctions put in place after China's 1989 crackdown on demonstrators in Beijing's Tiananmen Square would make it possible to sell spare parts for 24 Blackhawk helicopters that Beijing acquired in 1984.

Snarled Congo talks shift to S. Africa
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia Peace talks called to put an end to three years of bloodshed in Congo were reported deadlocked, and were to be pursued at a later date in South Africa.
Rebels attending the an inter-Congolese dialogue described the talks as bogged down yesterday, a day after they began, and accused Kinshasa of stonewalling.
The dialogue, a key element of a cease-fire agreement signed in 1999, is meant to pave the way for a new political dispensation in Congo, a new army incorporating rebel fighters, democratic elections and a new constitution.

Militia chief faces East Timor charges
SALELE, East Timor An East Timorese militia leader implicated in the violence that ravaged the territory after its 1999 vote for independence from Indonesia returned home yesterday to face charges of organizing the carnage.
Nemecio Lopes de Carvalho, deputy commander of the Mahidi paramilitary gang, is the most senior anti-independence leader to return so far.
Pro-Jakarta militias murdered hundreds of people, laid waste to the territory and forced 300,000 to flee to West Timor after the overwhelming majority of voters opted to secede from Indonesia in a U.N.-sponsored ballot in August 1999.

Estrada accused of lies about funds
MANILA Government prosecutors filed a new perjury charge against former President Joseph Estrada yesterday, accusing him of lying about his net worth in 1998 to hide ill-gotten gains.
Mr. Estrada, who was ousted in January amid massive protests over a corruption scandal, already had been charged with perjury. In the new charge, Mr. Estrada was said to have misrepresented his net worth in 1998, when he reportedly hid more than $1.6 million.
In addition, he is being detained without bail on a charge of economic plunder, a capital offense involving criminal acts to amass nearly $1 million.

Protestant leaders plead for disarmament start
BELFAST Protestant political and religious leaders have appealed to the Irish Republican Army to start disarming to prevent the collapse of Northern Ireland's unity government.
Ulster Unionist leader David Trimble, who had resigned from the government, said his party's three remaining Cabinet ministers would resign this week if the IRA didn't move. An Ulster Unionist withdrawal would force Britain to resume direct rule of Northern Ireland.
But Mr. Trimble signaled he would run again for leadership of the province's power-sharing administration if the IRA began to disarm.

British report seizing record cocaine haul
LONDON Customs officers said they seized 1,100 pounds of cocaine Tuesday night when it was dumped out of a cargo plane that landed at a southern England airport the biggest haul of the drug ever in Britain.
The Boeing 707 landed after having traveled from the Caribbean via the Canary Islands. Customs impounded the aircraft and did not name the airline.
Five crew members and one airport worker were detained for questioning after officers collected six suitcases filled with 1,100 pounds of the drug at Southend airport in Essex county, Customs said.

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