- The Washington Times - Sunday, October 21, 2001

Anti-nuclear protests are held across France
TOULOUSE, France Thousands of anti-nuclear protesters demonstrated across France yesterday amid heightened fears of guerrilla attacks on the country's 19 nuclear plants after last month's attacks on the United States.
Police said some 2,500 protesters marched through the southern city of Toulouse, chanting anti-nuclear slogans and brandishing banners demanding the abolition of France's highly developed nuclear power and defense industries.
Activists pointed to the September explosion at a Toulouse petrochemicals plant, which killed 29 persons and injured thousands, as an example of how easily accidents can happen.
An additional 3,000 massed in Lyon in the southeast, while slightly smaller protests were under way at Colmar in the northeast, Lille in the north and Nantes in the southwest.

Rights lawyer's death described as political
MEXICO CITY The murder of a leading Mexican human rights lawyer who won international acclaim for taking on high-profile cases undoubtedly had political motives, a state prosecutor said yesterday.
Digna Ochoa y Placido, 38, who had been repeatedly attacked and threatened, was found dead Friday evening in her Mexico City office. A colleague found the body, shot in the head and legs, press reports said.
"There is no doubt the motive was political," prosecutor Bernardo Batiz told a press conference. A note was found with the body, threatening members of Mexico's left-leaning Party of the Democratic Revolution, he said.
She had received many death threats in the past three years and was twice kidnapped in 1999.

Burma, Cuba agree on cooperation pact
BANGKOK Cuba and Burma's military regime have signed an agreement to boost bilateral cooperation on economic and technological issues, state-run media reported yesterday.
The agreement was signed in Rangoon by Cuban Deputy Foreign Minister Jose Armando Guerra Menchero and his Burmese counterpart, Khin Maung Win, TV Myanmar said in a dispatch monitored here.
The Cuban official held separate meetings with several Burmese leaders, including the junta's powerful secretary- general, Lt. Gen. Khin Nyunt, and Foreign Minister Win Aung, TV Myanmar said.

Dalai Lama avoids surgery on knees
BOMBAY Doctors for the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, said yesterday he was well and did not need to undergo scheduled knee replacement surgery, it was reported.
The Dalai Lama was "fine," doctors in Bombay said after he underwent a daylong routine medical examination Friday, the Press Trust of India reported.
He had been scheduled to have both knees replaced in surgery on Tuesday, but the doctors said there was no need for the operation.

American goes on trial in China for spying
BEIJING China will try an American power industry consultant on spying and bribery charges tomorrow, his legal adviser said, days after a meeting between President Bush and Chinese leader Jiang Zemin.
The family of Fong Fuming, of West Orange, N.J., had hoped the Bush-Jiang meeting would inspire China to free him as a goodwill gesture. The two leaders met Friday on the sidelines of the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Shanghai.
Mr. Bush reportedly raised U.S. concerns over human rights during the talks, but there was no word on whether any individual cases were discussed.

Indians sing against AIDS
CALCUTTA Folk singers and actors began a 10-day AIDS awareness campaign yesterday in India's eastern state of West Bengal timed to coincide with the biggest annual Hindu festival.
The performers will visit 3,500 fairgrounds to use music and theater to drive home the dangers of AIDS to Bengalis celebrating the Durga Puja festival, organizers said.
The artists will also perform and distribute condoms at major road intersections, police barracks and in red-light areas.

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