- The Washington Times - Monday, October 22, 2001

Liberal 'charity'
"Before the kickoff of Oct. 3's lecture, sorry, episode of 'The West Wing,' [actor] John Spencer stated that profits from the show would be donated to the New York Firefighters 9-11 Disaster Relief Fund and the New York Police & Fire Widows' & Children's Benefit Fund. Fine, but since when are there proceeds from an individual TV episode? NBC, whose parent company, GE, donated $10 million to the relief effort, says it supported the episode, but 'didn't donate advertising dollars.' [Producer Aaron] Sorkin could not be reached for comment, but a source at Warner Brothers (which produces the show) says the money will come from a yet-to-be-calculated share of cable residuals, international sales, and broadcast syndication fees of the episode. That means the charities won't be seeing the dough until at least 2004 or until well into President Bartlett's second term."
Scott Brown and Lynette Rice, writing on "On the Money," in the Oct. 19 issue of Entertainment Weekly

Radical chic
"Walk across the University of California at Berkeley's main square, Sproul Plaza, on any of these warm and well-lit October afternoons and you are likely to encounter several hundred people busily denouncing the accumulated misdeeds of 'Amerika.' It's worth stopping, if only to read the weirdly imaginative placards being waved by many in the crowd. 'We did not bomb Timothy McVeigh's home country,' read one placard at a rally. 'Bomb the Terrorist Bases in Arlington and Langley,' urged another. In Berkeley, this passes for wit.
"Protest movements are a familiar part of Berkeley life and, just like all those that preceded it, this one has become routine. The protests lend a festival atmosphere to what would otherwise be just another anxious day on campus. If only it weren't such an exceedingly stupid festival.
"Even as local enthusiasm for the movement dries up, the protesters are digging in for a long campaign. There are also signs that the City of Berkeley is increasingly siding with the student movement. On the evening of Tuesday, Oct. 17, the Berkeley City Council, with strong student support, voted to condemn the war in Afghanistan. The resolution will surely prove just the first step in an effort on the part of left-wing legislators to gain political capital from the new anti-war movement."
David Orland, writing on "The War According to Berkeley," Oct. 18 in Boundless at www.boundless.org

Darwin's racism
"[Charles] Darwin tried to determine whether human races should be considered distinct species. In the end, he was unsure whether to rank the races 'as species or subspecies' but finally asserted that 'the latter term appears the most appropriate'
"Because natural selection must be the cause of the existence of the different races, Darwin argued that the various races would necessarily have varying intellectual and moral capacities. So that, for example, the 'American aborigines, Negroes and Europeans differ as much from each other in mind as any three races that can be named.'
"Darwin argued further that the different races created by natural selection were necessary and beneficially locked in the severest struggle for survival. This argument translated directly to his assessment of the evolutionary history of human races, and the necessary and beneficial extinction of the less favored races.
"'The civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace throughout the world the savage races. At the same time the anthropomorphous apes will no doubt be exterminated. The break will then be rendered wider, for it will intervene between man in a more civilized state, as we may hope the Caucasian and some ape as low as a baboon, instead of as at present between the Negro or Australian and the gorilla,' [Darwin wrote]."
Benjamin Wiker, writing on "Darwin and the Descent of Morality," in the November issue of First Things

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