- The Washington Times - Friday, October 26, 2001

Cole terrorist takes refuge in Afghanistan

SAN'A, Yemen The man who is said to have organized last year's attack on the destroyer USS Cole has taken refuge in Afghanistan, an Interior Ministry official said yesterday.

The Yemeni government identified Mohammed Omar Harazi, a Yemeni citizen, as a leading suspect in March.

U.S. and Yemeni investigators have concluded Harazi is in Afghanistan, the government-run military newspaper reported.

A Yemeni Interior Ministry official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, confirmed the accuracy of the report. A diplomat at the U.S. Embassy in San'a declined to comment.


Iraq is accused of oil smuggling

NEW YORK The United Nations accused Iraq yesterday of smuggling some $10 million worth of oil outside the U.N. humanitarian program by loading the petroleum into a tanker after U.N. inspectors left.

In 19 pages of documents submitted to the U.N. Security Council's Iraqi sanctions committee, Benon Sevan, head of the U.N. oil-for-food program, said the 500,000 barrels of oil were loaded onto the tanker Essex last May and August from the port of Mina Al-Bakr.

Iraq denied the accusations. In a written response, Baghdad's U.N. ambassador, Mohammed Aldouri, said the Iraqi oil-marketing organization found that all papers were in order and it had "no information on the subject of your letter."


Former Iranian queen found dead in Paris

PARIS The second wife of the late Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi of Iran, Queen Soraya, has died in Paris, police said.

A spokesman said the body of Soraya Esfandiari Bakhtiari was found yesterday in her apartment in the French capital's 8th District by someone close to her, who called the police.

"She apparently died of natural causes," the spokesman said. Police gave her age as 69.


New study pushed on sheep disease

LONDON Britain announced yesterday the beginning of an urgent new study to find out whether sheep have contracted bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease.

The decision comes after a debacle over the government's previous tests, which recently had to be abandoned after four years' work when it was discovered scientists had been examining cattle brains instead of those of sheep.

The government's chief scientific adviser, professor David King, said the latest scientific methods would be used in the new tests. They could establish within 48 hours whether an animal had mad cow disease.


Serbs in Belgrade rampage over Kosovo

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia Angry Serbs demanding to know the whereabouts of missing relatives in Kosovo broke through a police line and charged at the province's U.N. mission chief yesterday.

Hans Haekkerup was leaving a federal government building in Belgrade after talks with Yugoslav officials when about 100 people broke through the police cordon, kicking cars in his motorcade and hitting them with fists and sticks. No one was injured.

The Kosovo Serbs claim that ethnic-Albanian extremists abducted or killed hundreds of their relatives in the province in 1999 after NATO air strikes to punish former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic for his crackdown against separatist Kosovo Albanians.


Role for Vatican seen on Taiwan

ROME Ex-Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti, a veteran politician with intimate links to the Vatican, said yesterday the Holy See could easily resolve "the Taiwan question" if Beijing offered the prospect of diplomatic ties.

Mr. Andreotti, a key participant at a Rome conference on China's relations with the West, spoke a day after Pope John Paul II offered an olive branch to China, apologizing for errors of the colonial past and pleading for the forging of diplomatic ties.

Diplomats have speculated that in order to resolve the "Taiwan question," the Vatican could attempt to maintain that they had merely moved their embassy away from the mainland after the communist takeover and would be prepared to move it back.

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