- The Washington Times - Saturday, April 13, 2002

Maryland and Virginia, along with 25 other states, will share in $32.7 million in funding to continue Justice Department programs that provide scholarships and law enforcement training to college students willing to serve as police officers after graduation.
The Police Corps funds, administered by the department's Office of Justice Programs, amount to $31 million going to 22 states for the continued recruiting and training of police corps cadets and $1.7 million for five states to continue curriculum development.
"The Police Corps is a wonderful opportunity for highly motivated, qualified young people to receive federal assistance and serve our counties and cities as law enforcement officers," said Assistant Attorney General Deborah J. Daniels, who heads the Office of Justice Programs.
The Governor's Commission on Crime Control and Prevention in Maryland will received $3.14 million for continued recruiting and training of police cadets. The Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services will get $328,238 for continued curriculum development.
The Police Corps program provides students with as much as $7,500 a year toward a baccalaureate or graduate degree. Students can receive a maximum of $30,000 under the program, which covers tuition, room and board.
Justice Department officials said a state's participation in the program allows police and sheriffs' departments to increase the number of officers with advanced education and training assigned to community patrol. The program reduces local hiring and training costs by providing hiring agencies $10,000 for each participants' first four years of service.
"We are proud of the contributions the Police Corps is making to local law enforcement," Ms. Daniels said. "We expect this progress to continue as the program continues to increase the professional expertise of police officers through training and education."

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