- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 16, 2002

Carey ex-aide sentenced for illegal campaigning
A former top aide to ex-Teamsters boss Ron Carey has been sentenced to two years' probation for his role in the diversion of more than $538,000 in illegal campaign donations to Mr. Carey's unsuccessful 1996 re-election bid.
Jere Nash was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Griesa in New York, 55 months after his September 1997 guilty plea. The sentencing was made public yesterday.
Nash, who served as Mr. Carey's campaign manager, had agreed to cooperate with federal investigators in the Justice Department's probe of the Teamsters Union and the Carey re-election campaign.
Pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy and one count of making false statements and agreeing to cooperate, Nash was the government's chief witness in a perjury trial against Mr. Carey, although the former union boss was acquitted by a jury.

Death-penalty panel recommends changes
CHICAGO Illinois' death penalty needs major revision, but no change can guarantee that an innocent person will never be executed, a state panel concluded yesterday after a two-year study of the system.
The 14-member panel, formed by Republican Gov. George Ryan after he imposed a moratorium on executions two years ago, made 85 recommendations, ranging from videotaping all interrogations in the hope of curbing coerced confessions to establishing a statewide commission that would review local prosecutors' decisions to seek the death penalty.
The report also recommends cutting the list of 20 circumstances that warrant the death penalty to five murdering multiple victims, killing a police officer or firefighter, killing an officer or inmate in a correctional institution, murdering to obstruct justice, or murder with torture.

Jury selection begins in Waagner case
CINCINNATI Jury selection started yesterday for a man accused of mailing fake anthrax letters to abortion clinics nationwide and robbing banks in two states.
Clayton Lee Waagner, 45, was representing himself for his Cincinnati trial on federal firearms and stolen car charges, but did not speak in court yesterday as the judge questioned a pool of 60 potential jurors.
The federal charges in Cincinnati are separate from the federal investigation into whether Mr. Waagner mailed more than 550 anthrax hoax letters. He has not been charged in that case yet.

Traficant not returning to Congress this week
Rep. James A. Traficant Jr., convicted of racketeering and other charges, will not return to Congress this week amid warnings that his colleagues would move to expel him if he appears on the House floor.
Traficant Chief of Staff Charlie Straub said yesterday the congressman decided he didn't want to "put anyone in that position."
Traficant was found guilty last week of taking kickbacks from staff and bribes and gifts from businessmen.

Confession allowed in Yosemite murders
SAN JOSE, Calif. A California judge ruled yesterday that a motel handyman's confession to three killings around Yosemite National Park would be admitted to his multiple-murder trial later this year.
Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Thomas Hastings overruled defense objections to admit the confessions that Cary Stayner made to FBI officials and a local television news reporter after his arrest in July 1999.
Stayner, 40, already is serving a life term in federal prison for a separate 1999 Yosemite murder.

Nurse kills two, himself in shooting spree
LOS ANGELES A nurse shot three women, killing two of them and injuring the third critically, at a medical clinic yesterday before turning the gun on himself to commit suicide, authorities said.
The man, who was not immediately identified, opened fire at the Superior Medical Clinic at about 4:30 p.m. EDT in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce in an apparent murder-suicide, said Los Angeles sheriff's spokeswoman Faye Burgarin.

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