- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 30, 2002

The parents of former federal intern Chandra Ann Levy plan to attend a vigil tomorrow outside the Northwest apartment building where Miss Levy lived in the District before she went missing a year ago.
Authorities say they are no closer to solving the mystery of her disappearance since Miss Levy was last seen alive last April 30.
D.C. Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey said a detective is still assigned to the case, but private investigators hired by the Levy family have failed to come up with any answers.
Chief Ramsey said a flood of public interest that generated as many as 40 to 50 calls a day last summer slowed to a trickle after the September 11 terrorist attacks.
On April 12, a badly decomposed body found near 16th Street and Military Road NW briefly fueled rumors that Miss Levy had been found. The D.C. Medical Examiner's Office quickly announced that the body was not that of Miss Levy.
Phone calls to the Metropolitan Police Department yesterday were referred to the U.S. Attorney's Office in the District.
Channing Phillips, spokesman for U.S. Attorney Roscoe Howard, said Mr. Howard asked police not to give any more interviews on the Levy case because it could compromise an ongoing federal grand jury investigation.
"The investigation is still active and ongoing, and we're looking to wrap it up as expeditiously as possible one way or another," Mr. Phillips said.
But he would not provide a timeline for when the grand jury might finish its work, nor would he comment on published reports that Rep. Gary A. Condit, California Democrat, had testified before the grand jury on April 12.
Miss Levy disappeared from her third-floor apartment on 21st Street NW on April 30 after canceling her membership at the Washington Sport and Health Club. Searches of her residence uncovered no evidence of foul play. Police found packed luggage, along with her money and identification.
The only thing missing was her keys.
Police say she spent much of the morning of May 1 surfing the Internet. Computer records show she looked up several travel sites, as well as the address of the Klingle Mansion in Rock Creek Park.
Miss Levy was expected to return to her hometown of Modesto, Calif., to attend her graduate school commencement from the University of Southern California on May 9. She had completed an internship at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons on April 23.
Her parents attempted to contact her by phone from May 1 to May 6, before contacting the Metropolitan Police Department to report her missing.
The case drew worldwide media attention after reports surfaced that Miss Levy was having an affair with Mr. Condit.
Mr. Condit, 54, originally described Miss Levy as a friend and denied even to his colleagues having a relationship with her.
After four interviews with D.C. police detectives and FBI agents, Mr. Condit acknowledged his affair with her and that she had spent the night in his apartment, police sources said.
Police have said Mr. Condit is not a suspect, but they searched his apartment and interviewed him four times, most recently last July.
They also interviewed members of his staff in Washington and California, as well as his wife.
Mr. Condit announced on the House floor last November that he had received a subpoena from the U.S. Attorney's Office for documents in his congressional office in November.
In March, Mr. Condit lost a primary campaign for the House seat he has held since 1989.
Billy Martin, the Washington attorney representing the Levys, said two former D.C. homicide detectives he hired continue to uncover promising leads, which have been shared with authorities.
"We just need a break," Mr. Martin said. "We need somebody to come forward and give us the missing piece of the puzzle."
Miss Levy, who would have turned 25 on April 14, is still listed among the District's missing persons.
This article is based in part on wire service reports.

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