- The Washington Times - Thursday, April 4, 2002

African leaders push cease-fire in Congo
LUSAKA, Zambia Regional African leaders involved in the war in Congo said yesterday the warring parties needed to respect cease-fire agreements and implement plans to disengage and demobilize their troops.
In a joint statement issued after a one-day summit in Lusaka, the Zambian capital, the leaders also called for the continued withdrawal of foreign troops from the central African nation.
The summit was called to discuss continuing problems with the peace process to end the 3-year war that threatens to destabilize much of central Africa.

Bomb blast kills 4 in Indonesian town
AMBON, Indonesia A bomb killed four persons and wounded 55 in a Christian district in eastern Indonesia yesterday, posing a challenge to a deal to end Christian-Muslim bloodletting in the archipelago.
Witnesses said the blast, outside a karaoke bar in the center of the eastern city of Ambon, littered the street with hands, arms and legs and triggered violent protests by thousands of Christians in the area.
No group claimed responsibility for the blast, which came after the signing of a peace pact in February between Muslims and Christians to end three years of bloody clashes.

Zimbabwean opposition talks with government
HARARE, Zimbabwe Zimbabwe's opposition said yesterday it had begun talks with President Robert Mugabe's party after last month's disputed presidential election, but the gulf between them was wide and there was still no agenda.
A senior official of the Movement for Democratic Change, or MDC, said talks with the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF), headed by representatives from Nigeria and South Africa, got off to a slow start in Vumba, about 175 miles northeast of Harare.


8 die in Indian state ahead of Vajpayee visit
AHMEDABAD, India Eight persons died as violence flared once again in India's riot-racked Gujarat state yesterday, a day before a visit by Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee to the state where more than 800 have died in Hindu-Muslim bloodshed that began in February.
The latest victims included a family of five Muslims who were burned to death by a Hindu mob on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, Gujarat's main city.
Three others were killed and 20 injured when police sought to disperse Hindu and Muslim gangs hurling Molotov cocktails and throwing stones at each other in Ahmedabad and in the town of Umbhrat, 40 miles to the south.

Former minister arrested in Argentina
BUENOS AIRES Former Argentine Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo, a titan of Latin American finance until he fell from power last year amid fiscal chaos and food riots, was arrested yesterday during an investigation into arms smuggling.
Judge Julio Speroni has 10 days to decide whether to bring criminal charges against Mr. Cavallo for suspected involvement in illegal shipments from 1991 to 1995 of arms to Croatia and Ecuador.
Mr. Cavallo, as economy minister under former President Carlos Menem, was one of several ministers who signed decrees ordering arms sales to Panama and Venezuela, which ended up illegally in Croatia and Ecuador. Mr. Menem was placed under house arrest for five months last year amid probes into the smuggling, but was later released.

China frees Tibetan activist
BEIJING China has freed 76-year-old Tibetan activist Tanak Jigme Sangpo, imprisoned since 1983, on medical grounds with nine years left on his sentence, and has agreed to let him leave the country for treatment, a U.S.-based rights group said yesterday.
The warden of the Tibet Autonomous Region Prison ordered the release of Mr. Sangpo, held for counterrevolutionary propaganda and incitement, on medical parole, said John Kamm of the Dui Hua Foundation in San Francisco.
He called the Tibetan activist China's longest-serving political prisoner "that we know of."

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