- The Washington Times - Friday, April 5, 2002

D.C. police Executive Assistant Chief Terrance W. Gainer yesterday was named one of five finalists to become Atlanta's next chief of police.
Chief Gainer, the Metropolitan Police Department's No. 2 official since May 1998, said yesterday he has been exploring other jobs in the private and public sector for about three months, and added that he is not dissatisfied with the District's police force.
"It is like a father saying to his 32-year-old son that it is time to look for a place his own," said Chief Gainer, 54. "The toughest part of it would be leaving the department and Washington, D.C. We just built a new town home and the grandkids are here."
Metropolitan Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey said there will be a huge void in the department if Chief Gainer leaves.
"He's very talented. He's run his own department for eight years, and he's worked here for four more," Chief Ramsey said. "He's offered jobs in the past. I'm surprised he hasn't gone somewhere else by now."
Chief Gainer said he applied for the Atlanta job after being recruited. He said the Atlanta mayor's office is doing background checks and additional interviews of all the finalists, and he expects a decision by the end of the month.
"I think by the time that an offer would be made there would have to be a meeting of the minds," Chief Gainer said. "I would need to know more about the department and what are their expectations."
Chief Ramsey said he will try to hire someone from within the department to replace Chief Gainer if he is chosen. "I shouldn't have to go outside [the department]. I'll be looking at all the assistant chiefs. I would talk to all of them," he said.
Police sources said at the top on the list of candidates to replace Chief Gainer would be Assistant Chief Alfred Broadbent and Assistant Chief Michael Fitzgerald.
Chief Broadbent has been with the department 23 years and is now in charge of the Special Services Command. He was former director of the Maurice T. Turner Jr. Institute of Police Science and reorganized recruiting and training for new recruits, officers and police officials. He was formerly in charge of the department's Patrol Services Bureau.
Chief Fitzgerald, who joined the department in 1971, is now assistant chief of the Regional Operations Command for the east region which includes the 6th and 7th Police Districts, both east of the Anacostia River. Both districts have seen a decline in major crimes during his tenure.
He was promoted to assistant chief in charge of the Support Services Bureau in 1997 after being commander of the 4th Police District.
Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin yesterday announced the names of the five finalists at an 11:30 a.m. press conference there, but did not say who is the front-runner for the job. Mrs. Franklin said candidates from 25 states and the District applied for the post during the 3-month-long search.
"I am thrilled by the quality of candidates interested in leading our police force," she said in a prepared statement. "Their interest is testament to Atlanta's reputation as a city on the move. All of our citizens would be proud to have any one of the five finalists as head of our police department."
Chief Gainer is competing with Richard J. Pennington, who resigned as D.C. assistant police chief in 1994 to become chief of the New Orleans Police Department. Chief Pennington unsuccessfully ran for mayor of New Orleans a month ago.
Chief Gainer also knows another finalist Andre Parker, assistant deputy director of the Illinois State Police. Mr. Parker worked for Chief Gainer as his chief of staff when he headed the Illinois State Police in the 1990s.
The other two candidates are Isaiah Mapp, special agent in charge of the Atlanta office of the Secret Service, and Manual Vasquez, chief of police and safety services for the Dallas Independent School District.

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