- The Washington Times - Friday, August 23, 2002

The U.S. government is set to announce new sanctions on a North Korean company that has been penalized in the past for providing missile components to Pakistan and Iran.
Changgwang Sinyong Corp., also known as the North Korea Mining Development Trading Corp., is being penalized for violating the international Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), a set of agreements that limit the transfer of rocket technology to rogue states.
Bush administration officials would not specify which country received the North Korean shipments, or what was shipped, other than to say that they were components of missiles and missile systems.
A draft of the sanctions notice, to be published in the Federal Register on Monday, says the company "has engaged in missile technology proliferation activities that require the imposition of sanctions."
Those sanctions would prohibit the firm from any contact with U.S. officials for at least two years and would bar the sale of missile technology to the company for at least two years.
North Korea is not a signatory to the MTCR, though the Clinton administration tried to lure Pyongyang to enter the agreement in late 2,000 by offering to launch its nonmilitary satellites on U.S. rockets.
The company has been sanctioned earlier for close ties to Iran's Defense Ministry and to Pakistan.
In 1998 the Clinton administration penalized the company for providing Pakistan with "maraging steel" from Russia that was used in Islamabad's Ghauri missile program. The Ghauri is modeled after the North Korean Nodong missile.
The CIA's latest report on missile proliferation says that North Korea provided missile components to Egypt, Iran, Libya and Pakistan in 2001.


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