- The Washington Times - Tuesday, August 6, 2002

FBI investigators arrive at Hebrew University
JERUSALEM An FBI team arrived yesterday to work with Israeli police investigating the bombing by the militant group Hamas that killed seven persons at Hebrew University, including five Americans.
The four-person team will visit the site of Wednesday's bombing and will pool its information with Israeli security forces, who will lead the search for the bombers, police spokesman Ofer Sivan said.
President Bush has been sharply critical of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat for not cracking down on militants, and Hamas is one of three Palestinian factions on a U.S. list of terrorist groups.

Vatican excommunicates rebel female priests
VATICAN CITY The Vatican has excommunicated seven women who claim to be priests and refuse to repent, saying yesterday that the group had "wounded" the Roman Catholic Church.
The women from Austria, Germany and the United States participated in an ordination ceremony June 29 carried out by Romulo Braschi, an Argentine who calls himself an archbishop but whom the Vatican rejects.
Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, set a July 22 deadline for the women to reverse their claims. The women declined.

Palestinian children suffering malnutrition
GAZA STRIP One in five Palestinian children under age 5 is suffering from malnutrition as Israeli blockades and curfews make food hard to come by, preliminary findings of a study funded in part by the United States showed.
The survey, funded by humanitarian organization CARE International and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), drew an urgent appeal by the Palestinian health minister for more international aid, but little sympathy from his Israeli counterpart.

Saudis blacklist firms for Israeli imports
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia has blacklisted about 200 foreign companies during the past 10 months for exporting $150 million of Israeli products into the oil-rich kingdom, a Saudi trade official said yesterday.
Ahmed al-Ouda, a counselor in the kingdom's chamber of commerce, told the Associated Press that the companies mostly Jordanian and Cypriot forged certificates of origin of Israeli products in order to export them into the Saudi market.
Mr. Al-Ouda said the companies including 72 from Jordan, 70 from Cyprus, 23 from Egypt and 11 from Turkey will not be able to trade in Saudi Arabia again.

British couple lands in wrong Sydney
LONDON A British couple are getting over the shock of landing on the wrong continent after the tickets they bought for a dream holiday in Sydney took them to a town in Canada instead of the sun-kissed Australian metropolis.
Emma Dunn and Raoul Sebastian, both 19, booked their tickets from London over the Internet and only realized something was amiss when they were asked to transfer to a plane in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

British minister travels to Libya
LONDON Britain takes a high-profile step today toward rebuilding ties to Libya with the first official visit in two decades to the North African country it branded for years a terrorist pariah.
Foreign Office minister Mike O'Brien will urge Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi to speed up his country's rehabilitation by renouncing militant links and cooperating with efforts to tackle terror and curb the spread of weapons of mass destruction.

Ugandan rebels fire on refugee camp
KAMPALA, Uganda Ugandan rebels fired on panic-stricken refugees yesterday, forcing 24,000 to flee and killing 14 in a dawn raid on a U.N. camp, a spokeswoman from the body's refugee agency said.
Rebels from the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abducted two Ugandan aid workers during the attack, in which they commandeered an armored vehicle and turned its guns on fleeing refugees before setting it ablaze, Bushra Malik said.

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