- The Washington Times - Saturday, December 28, 2002

Kemp downgrades Iraq threat

The massive amounts of time the Bush administration, the Pentagon and other government agencies have spent on justifying and preparing for a "preventive" war against Iraq have contributed to the meager results achieved in the past year on the war against Osama bin Laden and his al Qaeda network. In addition, deteriorating relations with North Korea and that country's acknowledgement of an advanced nuclear weapons program pose another challenge to the Bush administration.

Now Jack Kemp, former Republican presidential candidate, congressman and NFL quarterback, argues in "Call Saddam's bluff" (Commentary, Thursday) that it is in America's best interests to enact a containment strategy rather than go to war against Iraq.

Mr. Kemp states: "Although Americans trust their government , there is, nevertheless, a growing awareness that the potential future threat posed by an isolated Iraq has been exaggerated while the real, immediate threat emanating from the North Korean-Pakistani-Iranian-Saudi axis has been downplayed and underestimated."

Add bin Laden and al Qaeda to the mix, and it's clear that America needs protection from the real and present danger at hand.

It's time for the Bush administration to declare victory with the U.N. weapons inspectors' return to Iraq and drop the bad idea of "preventive" war. Bin Laden and his ilk will not wait to launch another attack while President Bush fights his war with Iraq.


WILLIAM ELLERMAN

Silver Spring

New York's expat cops

Yesterday's Page One article about New York City exporting so many former top police officers ("New York supplies nation's top cops") should make one wonder how many former New York police officers now employed elsewhere are collecting retirement checks paid for by the private-sector workers of New York.

If they can still perform the job, why do they get a pension funded by New York's taxpayers? Generally, government employees can retire at a younger age than employees in the private sector. That is because they elect the people who pay them, much like the employee-owned at United Airlines. The difference here is that United is a private corporation that must make a profit to stay in business.

The city government of New York, on the other hand, is a monopoly on power and does not have to make a profit to exist.


CHARLES TOLLESON

Foster City, Calif.

Dissing the 'Dish' about pedophilia

Andrew Sullivan should have done some research before accusing Accuracy in Media of inaccurately summarizing the findings of Dr. Timothy Dailey of the Family Research Council about homosexuality and pedophilia ("The Weekly Dish," Op-Ed, Dec. 20). Dr. Dailey's articles would have given him the statistics backing his claim that a disproportionate number of homosexuals seek adolescent males as sexual partners. Dr. Dailey shows that the number of exclusive male homosexuals in the general population is about 2.5 percent, but some portion of this small percentage of the population commits up to a third of the total number of child sex offenses.

Mr. Sullivan says that no major homosexual organization accepts pedophilia, and that NAMBLA (North American Man/Boy Love Association) is reviled by "every gay activist" that he knows. He should check the relationship between NAMBLA and the International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) from 1980 to 1994. A letter from Roy Radow of NAMBLA to ILGA dated Jan. 28, 1994, pointed out that six resolutions favorable to NAMBLA's positions had been adopted by the ILGA with the support of at least 80 percent of the delegates.

Mr. Radow said, "Their status as official ILGA positions is a matter of public record. Not one of these positions has ever been revoked by ILGA's membership, and all have been distributed to the media as recently as two months ago by ILGA's Information Secretariat as official positions."

Mr. Radow said the United Nation's Economic and Social Council was under pressure from the United States to deny the ILGA status as a nongovernmental organization unless it expelled NAMBLA. The ILGA chose to expel NAMBLA, but that doesn't mean that the 80 percent or more of its members who had voted for NAMBLA resolutions had altered their views on pedophilia. If Mr. Sullivan thinks they have, he should talk to the former altar boys who were abused by their priests.


REED IRVINE

Chairman

Accuracy in Media Inc.

Washington

Dropping a dud

The article "U.S. ready to unleash new weapons on Iraq" (Page 1, Thursday) cites the B-2 Stealth bomber as the only airplane that dropped bombs inside the city limits of Baghdad in 1991. That is incorrect. It was not the B-2 but the F-117A Stealth fighter that did the bombing. I was one of the pilots in the 415th Fighter Squadron, 37th Fighter Wing, who dropped those bombs.

The B-2 was then in its initial flight development stages and did not fly any combat missions in Operation Desert Storm or Desert Shield.


LT. COL. WES WYRICK

Air Force (retired)

Destin, Fla.

Dull stars

It was good to read an article exposing those who seem to think that their celebrity status qualifies them as authorities on their chosen causes and, therefore, expect the rest of us commoners to take heed of their message ("A star is scorned," Page 1, yesterday).

Where the article failed, however, was in making a clear enough distinction between those celebrities who simply rant and rave (Barbra Streisand, Sean Penn, Alec Baldwin, et al.) and those who actually stepped forward in an attempt to achieve change.

Sonny Bono, Jesse Ventura, Bill Bradley and Ronald Reagan were officials elected by the voters. They were elected for their ideas and convictions, not for their celebrity status. Regardless of what each did before seeking political office, they were elected on the basis of what they stood for, not because of what they became famous for.


SAM F. MURANO II

Boise, Idaho


Yes, we have Baghdad Sean and have Hanoi Jane: totalitarian spokespersons. And we have Barbra, who would like to join them, even though she cannot yet research her quotes to show us now intelligent she is. This is all normal.

But what was sorely missing this Christmas was a real American celebrity and hero, someone such as Bob Hope out there entertaining the troops. No, our Hollywood wannabe heroes and heroines were too busy buying gifts on Rodeo Drive and mouthing off to President Bush to show any concern for GIs on the front lines, who are there, as their forefathers, protecting Americans' freedoms, even the freedoms of dictator-licking groupies.

Fortunately, I have confidence that the average American, be he on the left or right, knows these Hollywood-lites don't represent the people. So let them continue to make themselves look ridiculous. It's a good reminder for all Americans that they are not the real people they pretend to be in films.


JAMES FEES

London

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