- The Washington Times - Saturday, February 23, 2002

Package at Army base investigated for anthrax
Mail handlers at U.S. Army Reserve Command headquarters in Georgia found a suspicious package yesterday and initial field tests indicated anthrax could be present, a Pentagon spokesman said.
Authorities evacuated the Fort McPherson building, said spokesman Col. Dan Stoneking. The initial field tests that indicated anthrax could be present are often inaccurate, Col. Stoneking noted.
Mail handlers on the fourth floor of the building noticed the suspicious package, which contained a white powder, at about 5:15 p.m. yesterday, Col. Stoneking said.

Evidence found of child sex abuse
PHILADELPHIA The Archdiocese of Philadelphia said yesterday it has found "credible evidence" that 35 priests sexually abused children over five decades, and relieved several of them of their duties.
About 50 children were victims, diocesan spokeswoman Catherine Rossi said.
Miss Rossi could not say how many of the 35 names had been given to police when the accusations were made. She said the archdiocese followed state law.

Immigrant smuggler gets 16 years in jail
PHOENIX A Mexican man was sentenced yesterday to 16 years in prison for smuggling illegal immigrants across the southern Arizona desert, where 14 of them died in the extreme heat.
Jesus Lopez-Ramos pleaded guilty in October to 25 smuggling counts 14 for the men who died and 11 for men who survived the trek in temperatures reaching 115 degrees.
Lopez-Ramos, 21, expressed remorse before U.S. District Judge Susan R. Bolton imposed the sentence. "I am very sorry for the fate of the victims and the families," he said.

Pakistani brothers to be deported
DENVER A 23-year-old Pakistani citizen who has been detained by immigration authorities since shortly after the September 11 terrorist attacks was sentenced yesterday to time served.
Armoghan Absar Rizvi pleaded guilty to falsely claiming U.S. citizenship on a job application. His attorney said he is likely to be deported next week.
Rizvi was a senior at Regis University before he was arrested and detained. Rizvi's brother, Arsalan Absar Rizvi, 27, pleaded guilty earlier this month to a federal charge of illegal ownership of a rifle. He also was sentenced to time served and ordered deported.

Ex-sheriff indicted in rival's killing
ATLANTA A grand jury indicted a former Georgia sheriff yesterday on charges of murdering the man who beat him in a bitterly contested sheriff's election.
A 19-count indictment was returned against former DeKalb County Sheriff Sidney Dorsey, who has been jailed without bond since November on a charge of murdering Sheriff-elect Derwin Brown, said Susan Cobleigh, a spokeswoman in the DeKalb County District Attorney's Office.
Mr. Dorsey's attorney, Brian Steel, was not immediately available to comment on his client's indictment. Mr. Dorsey has repeatedly denied involvement in Mr. Brown's killing.

Judge to be reinstated after 113 years
MIAMI It's been 113 years since the South's first black county judge took the bench in Key West, Fla. only to be removed by the governor nine months later for approving an interracial marriage.
Now, Judge James Dean will be reinstated after a Key West lawyer who read about him in the local paper's history column was inspired to clear his name.
Calvin Allen found in his research that the governor lacked the authority to remove judges. He and a committee of lawyers from the National Bar Association presented the case to Gov. Jeb Bush's office in December for reconsideration.
Bush spokeswoman Elizabeth Hirst said details of the reinstatement haven't been worked out but said the governor "thinks that it's more than appropriate to posthumously restore [Dean] and bring back some dignity to what he contributed to the state of Florida."


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