- The Washington Times - Monday, July 1, 2002

Battling 'Blabocracy'
"American political thought has become increasingly influenced by a group of tough, conservative, independent-minded women. Their ranks include, among others, Laura Ingraham, Monica Crowley and the late Barbara Olson. They are attractive, successful lawyers, journalists and Ph.D.s whose books, columns and radio talk shows display creative, conservative ideas while exposing the outrageous crimes and vacuous lies of the left.
"No one does this better than Ann Coulter. She is smart, well-educated, secure in her values and in possession of a laser-like ability to cut to the chase. Oh, and, at the risk of sounding chauvinistic, she is also a delight to behold.
"Read a few paragraphs of [her new book] 'Slander' and you quickly realize why Ann Coulter is a nightmare from which the left cannot awake.
"She illustrates how inane, hate-filled rhetoric becomes a mantra that permeates the thought and speech of the entire liberal establishment, from Democrat political hack James Carville to Sen. Ted Kennedy to the editors of the New York Times a one-note cabal she calls the 'Blabocracy.'
"Liberals have become intellectually lazy, she contends, because they are never challenged by media sycophants to defend their ideas. Therefore, emotion has replaced thought and name-calling has replaced rational argument."
Doug Patton, writing on "Coulterizing the Left," Thursday in GOPUSA News at www.gopusa.com

Futuristic flop
"The promos for Steven Spielberg's 'Minority Report' tout the film as a thinking man's noir thriller. It is in fact an overwrought, incoherent, and incredible noir flop. It's such a failure that one wonders how it could have beaten 'Lilo and Stitch' in its opening weekend at the box office.
"Chief John Anderton (Tom Cruise), head of the futuristic, Washington, D.C., Precrime team is piecing together the visual data to construct the scene of a murder that is about to happen. The information is supplied by the three all-stars of the Precrime unit, psychics (called the 'pre-cogs') who see future murders and thus enable an aggressive police force to arrest and convict criminals before they ever act on or, in some cases, are even aware of their murderous designs. When the pre-cogs tag Anderton as a future killer, he begins to suspect flaws in the system and sets out to prove his innocence.
"In the hope of discovering information about the pre-cogs and the possibility that they could predict a false positive, Anderton visits their inventor, a portly elderly woman. Along with giving him the advice he needs, she adds her own made-for-noir platitude ('to see the light sometimes you must risk the dark') and for inexplicable reasons plants a big wet kiss on Anderton's lips (perhaps she was channeling Rosie O'Donnell.)"
Thomas Hibbs, writing on "Minority Report," Friday in National Review Online at www.nationalreview.com

Borking Pickering
"The United States, officially a democratically ruled federal republic, is, in effect, a kind of judicial theocracy, the legal fiction whereby unelected judges at various levels effectively rule in what we call a democracy.
"Federal Judge Charles Pickering was denied a seat on a U.S. Court of Appeals in a series of essentially unfounded personal attacks. A one-vote [Judiciary Committee] majority prevented the presentation of Judge Pickering's name to the full Senate where, it was widely assumed, he would have been confirmed. The reason for maligning Pickering was succinctly stated by [Judge Robert] Bork: 'The immediate explanation, of course, was the Democratic Party and its allies People for the American Way, NOW, NARAL, and other left-wing groups immolated Pickering to warn George W. Bush that they had the votes in the committee to defeat any Supreme Court nominees who bore the slightest resemblance to Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas."
Harold O.J. Brown, writing on "Who Rules? What Rules?" in the June issue of the Religion and Society Report


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