- The Washington Times - Sunday, July 7, 2002

CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla. (AP) No funeral services are planned for Ted Williams, his attorney said yesterday, as a dispute arose over the plans for the remains of the baseball great.
Williams died Friday in a hospital near his home in west-central Florida. He was 83.
"Ted Williams was a private person in life, and in death he wished to remain private," Eric Abel, Williams' attorney, said in a statement. "He did not wish to have any funeral or funeral services."
Boston Red Sox officials said they have tentatively scheduled a memorial celebration on July 22 at Fenway Park, Williams' home field for 19 seasons.
Yesterday, Williams' estranged daughter accused her half brother, John Henry Williams, of planning to cryogenically freeze their father's body and preserve his DNA, perhaps to sell in the future.
Barbara Joyce Williams Ferrell, in a story first reported by the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald, said John Henry first brought up cryogenics after Williams' open-heart surgery in 2001.
"He said the way they're going with medical science and DNA, we could freeze dad's body, or we can freeze his head," Ferrell said. "He said, we could sell the DNA.
"I told him [Dads] against cryogenics. It is very immoral. I said I was against it and I would stand against it."
John Henry Williams did not immediately return a phone messages.
Abel refused to confirm or deny any talk of cryogenics. He called the idea of selling DNA or cloning an "absurd proposition."
"The Williams family members are in a period of great grieving," Abel said. "It is unfortunate that Barbara Joyce Ferrell has taken this moment to grab headlines."
Ted Williams' body is at the Hooper Funeral Home in Inverness. Associate Thomas Edwards said that funeral arrangements were incomplete.
Abel asked, at the request of the Williams' family, that instead of flowers, donations be made to the Jimmy Fund, a Boston-based charity, or the Ted Williams Museum in Hernando.

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