- The Washington Times - Sunday, November 3, 2002

Books

•"The Complete Idiot's Guide to Internet Privacy and Security," by Preston Gralla, Alpha Books, 2002. This book gives the lowdown on privacy and includes information on deciphering privacy policies and ways to surf anonymously.

•"The Parent's Guide to Protecting Your Children in Cyberspace," by Parry Aftab, McGraw Hill, 1999. A total program for keeping children safe on the Internet, this book alerts parents to the dangers, including how to spot dangerous spam.

Associations

•National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 699 Prince St., Alexandria, VA 22314. Phone: 703/274-3900. Web site: www.missingkids.com. The organization is recognized internationally as an authoritative resource on child safety. Its Cyber Tipline (www.cybertipline.com) handles leads from individuals reporting the sexual exploitation of children, and features a section for reports of unsolicited obscene material sent to a child.

•Federal Trade Commission, CRC-240, Washington, D.C. 20580. Phone: 877/382-4357. Web site: www.ftc.gov. The FTC regulations concerning unsolicited commercial e-mail can be viewed at www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/edcams/spam/; the site also contains consumer and business information, data about the FTC's recent law-enforcement actions against spam and consumer tips on how to reduce spam e-mail. The FTC-cosponsored site www.Kidsprivacy.com outlines privacy laws and safety issues for children and their parents.

Online

•Parents can check out the "other side" by visiting Bulkbarndotcom, a bulk e-mail site (www.bulkbarn.com/club.html) that tells spammers how to send their notices and advertises e-mail addresses and bulk-mailing software and services.

•For-profit e-mail-consulting service Email 911 (www.email911.com) offers extensive, easy-to-digest information about avoiding spam and contains a special section on children's Internet safety.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide