- The Washington Times - Thursday, November 7, 2002

Republicans have a right to feel triumphant this morning. The hesitant man who moved into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in January 2001 has proved himself to be not only a good and trusted war leader, but a cunning and bold political leader. Hard as it may be for most Democrats and some Republicans to contemplate, George W. Bush has displayed many of FDR's governing attributes. Just as many Republicans choked on the success of "that man" back in the 1930s, so many devout Democrats must be having trouble swallowing today.
What intimidated and infuriated Republicans during the FDR era was his ability to connect with the public and his willingness to cunningly even ruthlessly use that skill to support his party's interests. FDR was a dangerous man to take on and so is Mr. Bush. While the hard work of thousands of Republican candidates and party workers was essential for Tuesday's triumph, nonetheless, this was Mr. Bush's victory. He and his advisers designed it, picked the candidates, raised the money and sold it to the American people. From the Stone Mountain of Georgia to the Great Plains of the Midwest to the sandy shores of Florida, this was a victory that George built.
But, no electoral victory is ever complete; democratic governance is always a work in progress. And no accumulation of power is ever sufficient to gain all of a party's governing objectives. The White House and the Senate and House Republican leadership must prevent this triumph from turning into triumphalism. In the coming months there is much legislation that can and should be enacted. If the Republicans will be satisfied with about 80 percent of their legislative goals, success should be theirs. If they go for 100 percent, they will engender a bitterness in the opposition that will give rise to a legislative garden of thorns.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide