- The Washington Times - Friday, September 27, 2002

Milosevic smiles at genocide charges

THE HAGUE Slobodan Milosevic smiled across a U.N. courtroom yesterday as prosecutors accused him of genocide, the gravest charge he faced, claiming he was the kingpin in a plan to wipe out Bosnia's Muslims.

On the opening day of war crimes hearings on his role in the 1991-95 wars in Croatia and Bosnia, Mr. Milosevic portrayed Serbs as victims of ethnic aggression and said his policies had been aimed at peace, not war.

The first part of his trial, on the 1998-99 Serbian crackdown on the Albanians in Kosovo, ended September 11 and hearings were adjourned for two weeks to give Mr. Milosevic time to prepare for the next stage of the proceedings.

The charges are the gravest and toughest yet to prove in Mr. Milosevic's trial. The former Serbian strongman held power in Yugoslavia for 13 years, but prosecutors said he was careful not to leave incriminating evidence.


China praises U.S.-N. Korea meeting

BEIJING China said yesterday it welcomed plans by the United States to send an envoy to North Korea.

"We think this is a positive step," Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Zhang Qiyue told a news conference.

Washington announced on Wednesday it soon would send an envoy to North Korea, a nation branded by President Bush as part of "an axis of evil," along with Iraq and Iran.

A senior U.S. official in Washington said he expected Assistant Secretary of State James Kelly to visit the North Korean capital of Pyongyang in October.


Hindus attack Muslims in India

AHMADABAD, India Hindu nationalists held angry protest marches and mobs stabbed two Muslim men in western India yesterday as Muslims fled their homes to seek safety, fearing revenge riots after a bloody attack on a Hindu temple.

Paramilitary police deployed in several towns in Gujarat state, and officials said they were confident they could prevent a repeat of the sectarian violence that tore the state for three months earlier this year, leaving 1,000 dead, mostly Muslims.

Gujarat's top elected official, Chief Minister Narendra Modi, blamed Islamic militants for an attack Tuesday that claimed the lives of 31 Hindu worshippers.


Ukraine denies selling radar system to Iraq

NEW YORK Ukraine's foreign minister yesterday rejected U.S. accusations that his country sold a radar system to Baghdad, and invited U.N. or American inspectors to investigate the charge.

Anatoliy Zlenko met with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan briefly before discussing the accusations with Ole Peter Kolby, the Norwegian ambassador who heads the sanctions committee.

"The accusation is groundless," Mr. Zlenko told reporters.


Burma dictator kin sentenced to die

RANGOON, Burma A special court sentenced former dictator Ne Win's son-in-law and three grandsons to death after convicting them of treason yesterday for plotting to overthrow Burma's military government.

The government has said that Ne Win's relatives planned a coup because they were upset at losing economic and political privileges as Ne Win gradually was pushed out of the power structure.

The 91-year-old former leader, who ruled Burma with an iron hand for 26 years, has been under house arrest since the coup plot emerged in March.


Jedi, Klingons join Oxford dictionary

LONDON Jedi, Klingons and Grinches have found a place in the new edition of the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, published yesterday.

The new edition, distilled from the massive Oxford English Dictionary, includes 3,500 new words that have met the publisher's test of appearing in at least five printed sources within five years.

Jedi, from "Star Wars," and Klingons, from "Star Trek," joined Grinches (spoilsports), which originated in the fantasies of author Dr. Seuss


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