- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 22, 2003

ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Alabama chief justice famous for his Ten Commandments fight warned an audience last night of "great consequences" when America turns away from God and suggested the September 11 terrorist attacks might be an example.
Chief Justice Roy Moore, in Washington to accept an honorary divinity doctorate from the National Clergy Council and Methodist Episcopal Church U.S.A., implied a parallel between the attacks and the 40-year legal erosion of religion's public standing, including displays of the Ten Commandments.
He pointed out similarities between the devastation and the biblical words of Isaiah, who had forecast a "day of great slaughter, when the towers fall."
"How many of you remember Americans running to get gas masks because [of] some bearded man in Afghanistan?" Justice Moore asked during his address at Georgetown University. "Fear struck this country . You see, there are consequences when we turn away from our source of our strength."
The remarks on the 2001 attacks came near the end of the judge's 30-minute speech. Up to then, he had largely discussed his political fight to return prayer to school and the Ten Commandments to the public square.
In 2001, the Rev. Jerry Falwell was widely criticized when he said that pagans, abortionists, feminists, homosexuals and civil liberties groups has secularized the nation and helped the September 11 attacks occur. Justice Moore was not that specific, but he strongly hinted at a causal relationship between the attacks and the removal of God from public space.
Justice Moore, a conservative Christian, first became famous as a circuit judge in Gadsden, Ala., when he refused to remove a wooden Ten Commandments display from the wall of the courtroom, despite the ruling of a U.S. District judge that he do so.
During his campaign for chief justice, he was often referred to as "the Ten Commandments judge."

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