- The Washington Times - Monday, July 21, 2003

Gold rebuts Bandar

Dore Gold, former Israeli envoy to the United Nations, yesterday challenged the Saudi ambassador to read the documents he has seen linking Saudi Arabia to terrorism.

Mr. Gold, in a interview with Embassy Row, responded to two days of fierce criticism from Ambassador Prince Bandar bin Sultan.

“I suggest Prince Bandar read the Saudi documents in Arabic that were discovered at Palestinian headquarters, which describes a direct connection between the Saudi government and the terrorist campaign of Hamas against the people of Israel,” Mr. Gold said.

He said one document with a Kingdom of Saudi Arabia letterhead detailed assistance from the “Saudi Committee for Aid to the Al Qods Intifada.”

“This was established in the fall of 2000 by Prince Nayef, the interior minister. This is not an NGO (nongovernmental organization). This is a government organization,” Mr. Gold said.

Prince Bandar on Thursday sent a letter to Rep. Henry J. Hyde, Illinois Republican and chairman of the House International Relations Committee. In it, he complained about Mr. Gold’s accusations of a Saudi-Hamas link, which were made earlier last week.

On Friday, Prince Bandar issued a public statement in an e-mail.

“I have become aware of the latest diatribes made by Dore Gold … . It should be known that Dore Gold is not an expert on Saudi society, faith or culture. He is simply hatred’s scribe,” Prince Bandar said, referring to Mr. Gold’s book about Saudi Arabia, titled “Hatred’s Kingdom.”

“Dore Gold seeks to instill fear and animosity among friends and allies. While others are working to eliminate incitement and promote peace, Dore Gold works to perpetuate hate and conflict. He has opposed virtually every major peace initiative over the past two decades.

“Dore Gold has carried on a campaign of lies and unsubstantiated accusations. … Thoughtful people should become aware of his objective, and it is time that he abandoned his evil path and join the majority of peace-seeking individuals on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian divide as they search for a just and comprehensive peace.”

Mr. Gold, whose doctoral dissertation at Columbia University was on Saudi Arabia, also served as an Israeli envoy to the Arab Persian Gulf states.

He noted that he had been a delegate to a peace summit in Aqaba, Jordan, in June.

“But I did not see Prince Bandar there,” he added.

Fabio’s Chinese exchange

The guests at the Chinese ambassador’s dinner included many Washington fixtures, such as former Secretary of State Alexander Haig, former Undersecretary of State Thomas Pickering, former National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski and Douglas D.M. Joo, president of The Washington Times.

And there was Fabio.

The Washingtonians may not have known the tall, blond man dressed in black, but many of the Chinese women at the dinner fluttered around the former male model they have seen on the covers of millions of romance novels circulating in China.

Fabio told Embassy Row that he is preparing to help Ambassador Yang Jiechi promote cultural exchanges in his role as a partner in CDEF Productions, a performing -rts management firm in Los Angeles.

He said he is preparing to open a line of women’s fashions in China.

“It’s time for another Marco Polo,” Eric P. Ashenberg, one of his business partners, said yesterday.

He said Fabio will introduce the fashion line in this country first, in September for Sam’s Club, a subsidiary of Wal-Mart.

Fabio, whose real name in Fabio Lanzoni, was in Washington last week to attend a dinner Mr. Yang had hosted to introduce Chinese pianist Li Yundi, the 21-year-old winner of the 2000 Frederic Chopin International Piano Competition in Warsaw.

Mr. Li brought the guests to their feet in repeated ovations for his performances of Chopin’s Scherzo No. 2 and Liszt’s Piano Sonata in B Major.

Call Embassy Row at 202/636-3297, fax 202/832-7278 or e-mail [email protected]


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