- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 29, 2003

Political ‘Blonde’

“The PG-13-rated ‘Legally Blonde 2: Red, White, & Blonde’ is not only a bad movie — it’s surprisingly subversive. It’s a poster child for conservative-bashing, liberal-agenda-setting, political correctness innocuously packaged in lightweight comedy.

“‘Blonde 2’ … is the sequel to the surprise 2001 hit, a slight but crowd-pleasing comedy that celebrated the beauty of blonde-dom: fabulous shoes, perfect hair, and the joy of retail shopping. ‘Legally Blonde’ had sexual humor, but was buoyed by a sweet, good-natured edge, some funny running jokes, and a very charismatic performance by as Elle Woods, would-be lawyer and ultimate blonde. …

“But here’s what most audiences are likely to remember from ‘Legally Blonde 2’: that the dog is gay. Elle’s beloved Chihuahua, Bruiser, is ‘outed’ during the film. He falls in love with a Republican congressman’s much larger Rottweiler at a doggy beauty salon. …

“Bruiser’s sexuality becomes a recurrent theme, and is the most ludicrous element in a film awash in vapid political correctness. It may be hard to imagine, but the ditsy fun of the first film has been replaced by a political agenda. Shockingly, ‘Legally Blonde 2’ is an issue movie.”

Andrew Coffin, writing on “Blonde’s Ambition,” in the July 19 issue of World magazine

‘Liberal schlock’

“The one reason we have no great American novelists is that all the smartest writers from Harvard end up going to Hollywood and writing movies. And if you look at which movies are successful, despite the liberal schlock they stuff down our throats, the movies tend to be family-oriented conservative movies. …

“On TV, ‘Touched by an Angel’ was fabulously successful. Even ‘Something About Raymond,’ which I’ve only seen a few minutes of (and I don’t find it particularly funny). Its runaway popularity is because it is one of the rare shows on TV right now that is not about gay men. …

“And sodomy is gleefully laughed upon now. I keep telling my friends in Hollywood that I have a novel idea for a new TV show — ‘How about a show about a heterosexual couple?’ …

“One thing I really find amazing is what a religious country this is — ever since the Pilgrims landed. And all the cultural indicators coming from TV and Hollywood and the Supreme Court and the lefties and Vanity Fair is to constantly make fun of people who believe in God and portray them one step short of a Nazi. Still after 30 years of this, you poll the American people, and 80 percent of them believe in God and regularly go to religious services.”

Ann Coulter, interviewed by David Bowman, Friday in Salon at www.salon.com

Sexy smart

“The obituaries for Katharine Hepburn that I saw … were oddly gratifying. … Hepburn had been in films for 62 years, longer than any other American female star. In tone and temper she was unique. At the start her individuality, her arched-neck air had not always helped her. …

“But Hepburn triumphed … partly in a way that she herself might not have foreseen. … [U]nlike any other American actress, she made intelligence sexy. … Then, too, Hepburn’s beauty was, like her temperament, unique. …

“Despite the help of coaches along the road, she never really modified her upper-class New England accent. … As for the voice itself, she was well able to maneuver through the general reaches of drama or comedy, but sometimes the high moments of a role left her flapping. Even in the obituary film clips, there were occasional stretches of six or eight seconds when, to put it candidly, she sounded like a duck quacking. … Such sounds might have capsized a lesser career, but Hepburn almost flaunted them.”

Stanley Kauffmann, writing on “Exit the Queen,” in the Monday issue of the New Republic


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