- The Washington Times - Friday, March 28, 2003

While brand-new to the streets of America, Mitsubishi's pocket-rocket supercar has been driven by millions already.
It's not that it's been produced in volume elsewhere, although it has been sold in small numbers in Japan and Europe before coming to U.S. shores.
It's because it's become one of the hottest rides in the rapidly growing video gaming industry.
In 1997, a Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution first appeared in a game called V Rally by Infogrames Multimedia.
Today, EVO has become a player in 60 games for game consoles (like Play Station) and in 15 arcade games.
Video games have not only introduced millions of people to Mitsubishi vehicles, they have also built an awareness of Mitsubishi's worldwide racing brand: Ralliart.
Many games allow the users to modify their vehicles with high-performance racing parts made by Ralliart.
Mitsubishi Motors North America recently announced that Ralliart performance parts will be available in North America, along with a line of factory-tuned Mitsubishi Ralliart model vehicles.
Started in 2002, RalliSport Challenge incorporates four types of Rally competition into one game: Hill Climb, Rallycross, Ice Racing and Traditional Rally.
Published by Microsoft Game Studios, gamers can choose from 29 vehicles, including the EVO VI and 6.5, and compete on 48 tracks, in Safari Challenges in East Africa, on frozen Nordic roads or on the treacherous hills of the Pacific Northwest competing to conquer four classes of racing: Pro, Expert, Classic and Unlimited.
Video game industry sales took in $9.4 billion in 2001, surpassing Hollywood domestic box office sales, which took in $8.3 billion the same year.
It is estimated that 60 percent of all Americans age 6 and older, or close to 145 million people, play video and computer games. The average age of a game player is 28.

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