- The Washington Times - Monday, August 16, 2004

PRESIDENT BUSH

Addresses the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in Cincinnati; participates in a Bush-Cheney ‘04 rally in Traverse City, Mich.; returns to the White House.

ECONOMIC REPORTS

4 p.m. Agriculture Department releases the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s report on crop progress. Location: 12th Street and Independence Avenue SW. Contact: 800/727-9540.

4:15 p.m. —Federal Reserve release its weekly reports on the assets and liabilities of U.S.- and foreign-chartered banks and on foreign exchange rates. Location: Constitution Ave between 20th and 21st streets NW. Contact: 202/452-3206.

SUPREME COURT

No oral arguments are scheduled. Contact: 202/479-3211.

SENATE

Not in session. August recess. Contact: Republican Cloakroom, 202/224-8601, or Democratic Cloakroom, 202/224-8541.

SENATE COMMITTEES

9:30 a.m. Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee holds a hearing on recommendations of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. Witnesses include panel Chairman Thomas H. Kean, panel Vice Chairman Lee H. Hamilton, and Asa Hutchinson, Homeland Security undersecretary for border and transportation security. Location: 253 Russell Senate Office Building. Contact: 202/224-1251.

9:30 a.m. — Governmental Affairs Committee holds a hearing on reorganizing the U.S. intelligence community. Witnesses include William Webster, former FBI director and former CIA director; James Woolsey, former CIA director; and Stansfield Turner, former CIA director. Location: 342 Dirksen Senate Office Building. Contact: 202/224-4751.

2:30 p.m. Armed Services Committee holds a hearing on implications for the Defense Department and military operations of proposals to reorganize the U.S. intelligence community. Witnesses include James Schlesinger, former defense secretary; Frank Carlucci, former defense secretary; and John Hamre, former deputy defense secretary. Location: 325 Russell Senate Office Building. Contact: 202/224-3871.

HOUSE

Not in session. August recess. Contact: Republican Cloakroom, 202/225-2020, or Democratic Cloakroom, 202/225-1600.

GENERAL AGENDA

Space science — all day National Academies’ Panel on Astronomy and Astrophysics holds a meeting on “Priorities in Space Science Enabled by Nuclear Power and Propulsion.” Events begin at 8:30 a.m.

Highlights — 8:30 a.m. Closed session

11 a.m. —“Introduction to Project Prometheus and JIMO (Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter),” with Ray Taylor, JIMO program executive at NASA. Location: National Academies’ Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW. Contact: 202/334-3477.

Nanotech 2004 — all day The Cambridge Healthcare Institute holds a conference, “Nanotech 2004.” Events begin at 8:30 a.m. Topics include drug delivery systems, nanoparticles for molecular imaging, rare transcript and single-cell analysis and minimally invasive medical technology. Location: Ritz Carlton, 1150 22nd St. NW. Contact: 617/630-1300.

Regional growth — 9:30 a.m. First Horizon Bank sponsors a press conference to review economic data on region growth of the D.C. metropolitan area. Stephen Fuller of the George Mason University School of Public Policy participates. Location: National Press Club, 14th and F streets NW. Contact: 703/744-7823.

Social Security’s future — 10:30 a.m. The 60 Plus Association holds a discussion, “Social Security’s Future.” Participants include Dorcas Hardy, former Social Security Administration commissioner; Christian Weller of the Center for American Progress; Lawrence Hunter of the Alliance for Retirement Prosperity; and Alvin Williams of Black America’s PAC. Location: National Press Club, 14th and F streets NW. Murrow Room. Contact: 703/807-2070.

Liberal Republicans — noon Log Cabin Republicans, Republican Youth Majority and Republicans for Choice hold a press conference, “Mainstrean Republican Organizations Unveil Platform.” Location: National Press Club, Lisagor Room, 14th and F streets NW. Contact: 202/347-5306.

Greenhouse conference — 2 p.m. Union of Concerned Scientists holds a conference-call briefing to release a study on the benefits of reducing emissions of heat-trapping gases to environmental and human health in California. Participants include Katharine Hayhoe of Atmos Research and Consulting, Christopher Field of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Michael Hanemann of the University of California, Berkeley, Stephen Schneider of Stanford University, and Peter Frumhoff of Union of Concerned Scientists. Contact: 202/223-6133 or 415/342-3328.Times

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