- The Washington Times - Saturday, July 31, 2004

“Glory Days” is the unofficial theme song for the liberals of the Baby Boomer generation. Everyone from Michael Moore to John Kerry is working diligently to bring the pervasive spirits of pessimism, mistrust and disillusionment that dominated their years on college campuses to the forefront of the university scene once more.

College professors have heard their leaders’ battle cries and rallied to fight for the cause. This is, of course, the only sort of fight in which they will ever take part. Professors are ready and willing to do their part to advance this plague of dissatisfaction. As a college student, I am sickened by the stories of radical left professors pushing their hateful, anti-American views on their students. In my American history class, my professor’s every mention of the Bush administration was prefaced with “The Regime.” The president of the United States, no matter his political affiliations, never deserves to be placed in the same category as real regime leaders like Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin.

Many professors and administrators uninterested in objective or balanced education for their students or in sparking intellectual debate in the classroom.

They would rather sit in their comfortable, air-conditioned offices and try to remember their days as campus crazies — that is, if they can. It is hoped their prodigious drug use didn’t burn up too many brain cells.

The current crop of college faculty are the same men and women who accused the U.S. leadership of being “warmongers” while their peers were being killed and tortured in North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camps.

Oh, how history repeats itself. The same people who denounced pro-democracy policies during Vietnam are once again weeping and gnashing their teeth. The Bush administration’s commitment to protecting America has drawn outcries from liberal pundits unparalleled in our history.

If college students didn’t hear about the left’s objections to the war on TV, radio or in the plethora of newspapers on campus, our professors have been solidly committed to preaching their views on the whole matter.

They long to mold the current generation of college students into the army of antiwar protesters they once were. Quick. Get the Bob Dylan albums out and make sure to buy a tie-dye kit. Surely, they believe, we would love to have the college experience they had. I, for one, definitely think the pot smoke haze that was the 1960s and ‘70s is among America’s finest moments. The left’s desire to recreate a nation of blubbering ingrates is truly astounding.

This dedication to promoting anti-American ideology has been a trademark of the liberal Boomers. Their mantras include every bit of reasoning once considered treasonous and cowardly. Run from war. Peace, and love yourself around Woodstock while men are dying. Dodge the draft and cloak yourself in the flag — just make sure it’s not one you plan to set on fire. Don’t fight, write. Write any and all the anti-American propaganda you can come up with. Or, in Michael Moore’s case, produce a fiction-portrayed-as-fact documentary and stuff your face with jelly doughnuts in hopes of being declared unfit for military duty.

They honestly believe it takes more courage to protest on the National Mall, while troops, the very ones they hate, protect their First Amendment Right to Assembly than to go overseas and fight for those freedoms.

My main source of amazement in the Boomer generation is that they are the children of the Greatest Generation. How does a significant number of a monolithic group veer so far off course? They have replaced loyalty and pride in America with singing the praises of the ever-cowardly French and declaring the policies of Germany, the nation responsible for the greatest atrocity in human history, superior to ours. While they denounce America, people fight and die for the country they love to hate.

Fortunately, my generation is tuning out the bunk they try to force-feed us everyday. We are returning to the principles that have made this country great for more than 200 years. Instead of spitting on our brave soldiers when they return from combat, we create organizations that send care packages and pieces of home to them. We, too, protest but it’s to condemn the liberal media’s searing portrayals of our country and its leadership. We will not allow freedom’s cause to get a bad rap in the press.

So, while the liberal Boomers continue throwing the temper tantrums they always do, my generation continues to fight and die for America and for the “Glory Days” yet to come.

RACHEL PARKER

Ms. Parker is a junior at the University of Alabama and is currently interning at the Clare

Boothe Luce Policy Institute in Herndon, Va.


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