- The Washington Times - Friday, May 14, 2004

Grease bandits make slippery getaway

EDMOND, Okla. — A thief has slipped away with nearly 5,000 pounds of used cooking grease bound for recycling.

Authorities say the grease from three restaurants has a resale value of about $380. The latest theft occurred sometime between Monday night and Tuesday morning, police said.

Police suspect the thief is someone familiar with the restaurant industry and is looking to turn in the grease for the recycling value, police spokeswoman Glynda Chu said.

The grease was to be picked up by Evergreen Grease Service of Cashion, which resells it.

Rock slide forces train off tracks

GRANBY, Colo. — A rock slide that derailed a coal train in the mountains west of Denver will force Amtrak to detour all trains coming through the state at least through today.

Union Pacific Railroad officials said the slide knocked the coal train off the tracks late Thursday near Granby, about 60 miles northwest of Denver.

Three workers were briefly trapped and suffered minor injuries. Railroad officials said none of the coal was spilled.

Union Pacific spokesman John Bromley said it was not clear when the tracks would open. He said crews were trying to avoid triggering any more slides as they moved equipment into the canyon.

Two men sentenced for defacing sculpture

DETROIT — Two men who threw white paint on the Joe Louis fist, a landmark sculpture commemorating the black boxing great, were sentenced Friday to 30 days in jail.

Brett Cashman, 45, and John T. Price, 27, pleaded guilty last month to malicious destruction of property and were also ordered to pay $1,000 in restitution.

They were credited with 26 days of time served and will serve the four remaining days on weekends, along with 18 months of probation.

Cashman and Price, who are white, were arrested Feb. 23 for throwing paint on the 8,000-pound sculpture of Louis’ arm and fist. They have said they targeted the sculpture because of its violent imagery, not as a racist act.

Louis, who died in 1981, is a hero in Detroit, where his family moved when he was a boy. The Detroit Red Wings hockey team plays in a downtown arena named for him, and the 24-foot fist sculpture has a prominent location along Jefferson Avenue.

DJs fired after joking about Berg’s death

PORTLAND, Ore. — Two disc jockeys were fired after playing an audiotape of the beheading of American Nick Berg by Iraqi militants, and cracking jokes about the grisly death.

Listeners called the radio station to complain after hearing Mr. Berg’s bloodcurdling screams in the broadcast of the tape, followed by the DJs’ laughing and playing musical accompaniments.

The DJs, known as Marconi and Tiny, were fired Thursday from their morning show perch at Portland’s KNRK-FM, which is owned by Pennsylvania-based Entercom Communications Corp.

Jury rejects lawsuit by motorist’s family

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — With police on edge against an outbreak of violence, a jury yesterday rejected a $1.6 million lawsuit brought by the family of a black motorist whose slaying by a white officer incited riots in 1996.

The jury of five whites and one black sided with the city, which argued that the family of TyRon Lewis, 18, deserved no money because Mr. Lewis was threatening the officer’s life when he was shot during a traffic stop.

Mr. Lewis had been pulled over for speeding by Officer James Knight. Officer Knight testified that Mr. Lewis locked the car’s doors, refused to come out and lurched the car at him several times, knocking him onto the hood. Officer Knight said he then fired three shots into the windshield, killing Mr. Lewis.

The officer was cleared by a grand jury and the Justice Department. Assistant City Attorney William Drake said that the officer “had every right to use deadly force” when Mr. Lewis used the car to threaten the officer.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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