- The Washington Times - Sunday, May 23, 2004

A woman’s place is in the … ?

“Political correctness trumps national security, even in wartime.”

Finally, someone has enough testosterone to tell the truth about the real cause of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal (“‘Take it like a man,’” Op-Ed, Friday).

However, there is even more to this scandal that needs to be told regarding the negative impact of women in the military. The politically correct disease of placating female soldiers is widespread in our military and is causing a breakdown in the discipline and order vital for maintaining an effective fighting force.

It starts with severely reduced requirements during coed basic training and continues with affirmative-action promotions of female officers (such as Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski). Rampant sexual misconduct between soldiers also is tolerated, as evidenced by the large number of pregnancies among single women in the military. Instead of discharging these women (along with the fathers), the military rewards them by paying for their pregnancies and subsidizing their new families.

Meanwhile, back in Iraq, American soldiers are dying, partly because of too few combat troops. Our already shrunken Army of 10 divisions is, in reality, just 8.5 divisions because 15 percent are noncombatant women. Gradually replace every female soldier with a male combatant, and presto, our effective fighting force increases 15 percent at no cost. Why is this obvious truth not being told by those demanding a larger military? Hopefully, Mr. Wheeler’s column will start a new national debate about women in the military.

So-called conservative commentators (especially on talk radio) need to take off their skirts and tackle this PC sacred cow head-on. They need to call for an end to this left-wing stealth assault on our military and demand a return to an all-male military. Otherwise, both our military and the war on terror are doomed.

LOU VENTICINQUE

Jamison, Pa.

Of fact and fiction

Two stories in the Thursday edition of The Washington Times made me cringe.

First was the story about the rise of “alcohol-related” traffic deaths (“DUI caucus, campaign begin,” Nation).

This terminology is garbage and does not relate to drunk-driving fatalities.

Using junk statistics to scare people as well as gain money and power is unconscionable. I request that The Times either refrain from using such stories or warn readers about the misleading wording from disreputable organizations.

Second is the story on traffic enforcement cameras in the District (“Spy cameras hit a monthly record,” Page 1). Speed-camera fines are nothing but a commuter tax, and while motorists get burned, Rep. Tom Davis fiddles. A statement by Lon Anderson, spokesman for AAA MidAtlantic, that there is “an epidemic of reckless drivers in the District” is hogwash. The truth is that D.C. speed limits are not set to proper standards, and thus the city is one big speed trap.

MICHAEL MCGUIRE

National Motorists Association

Falls Church

On fence-straddling

I noticed that William R. Hawkins (“Of ends and means,” Commentary, Friday) describes the incidents at Abu Ghraib prison as both “aberrant tactics of a few undisciplined, half-trained reservists” and, out of the other side of his mouth, as “pressure techniques” and even relatively “humane” ones at that.

OK, which is it? And why are some individuals so bent on keeping the public, even those of us who were supportive of military action in Iraq, from finding out?

ROB RANDHAVA

Washington

The eyes of the world

If Jennifer Harper or one of her loved ones had been among the detained and tortured prisoners in Iraq, she would not be complaining about the “caterwaul” press outcry (“Press can’t let abuse story go,” Nation, Friday).

No number of human interest stories can counterbalance those events. If a parent spends one week of the year torturing and sexually abusing his children, his attorney can’t defend him in court by pointing out how well he treated the children the other 51 weeks.

As for Saddam Hussein’s mass graves — well, civilian casualties in this war are up to around 10,000, not counting the many more who have been maimed and wounded, so we must be giving that old CIA-installed tyrant a run for his money.

GENEVA HAGEN

Victoria, British Columbia

Thank you for publishing the recent article by Jennifer Harper titled “Press can’t let abuse story go.” Kudos to you and your staff. As a military spouse, I am disgusted by what a few military members have done in the name of justice; however, I am even more disgusted and outraged by the media’s personification of the military at large as abusive and scandalous. Thank you for giving a voice to the thousands of other military members sacrificing it all to give to the Iraqis.

As Memorial Day grows near, I challenge you and other media outlets to give equal time, if not more, to the good being done in and for Iraq. Let’s all honor our country and our military. Let us portray America appropriately to the world. Again, thank you.

ASHELEY UNDERWOOD

Springfield

Dealing with multiculturalism

In reference to “Ehrlich decries multiculturalism as ‘damaging’” (Metropolitan, May 10): Thank you, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., for standing up and saying what you believe, even in the face of heated retaliation from the liberal news media concerning the subject of multiculturalism. Many of us agree with what you said.

I welcome people from other cultures into our society. America is a country made up of immigrants, but the difference between today’s immigrants and those of the past is that the earlier immigrants wanted to become apart of the American culture and worked hard to do so, while it seems the present-day newcomers don’t want to put forth much effort to assimilate into American culture.

They want the American culture to adjust to them. English is the language of this country. It makes no sense to make everyday life more complicated by bending over backward to provide everyday services in other languages.

If someone from another culture is so interested in coming to the United States, that person should make the effort to learn the language of this country. Many come here and expect everything to be provided to them by others. Even illegal immigrants expect to be provided with benefits due citizens of our country.

We should stop giving free handouts to those who come to this country for no other reason than to be catered to.

ROB BENSON

Dowell, Md.

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