- The Washington Times - Saturday, December 24, 2005

Why does the Democratic leadership want us to lose? Why does the leadership of the party that is putatively “for the people” want democracy in Iraq to fail? Is it simply their irrational hatred of George W. Bush? Their empty belief in moral relativism? Their nostrum of multiculturalism? Their pining for the “international community’s” approval? I would like to know, because I just do not get it.

Dec. 15, I was in a 7-Eleven store across the street from a hotel serving as a poll for Iraqi expatriates. Five Middle-Eastern looking men entered the store smiling and laughing. As I passed by the five I reflexively looked at their right index fingers. Each finger was shrouded in purple, marking the fact they had just voted in that day’s Iraqi Parliamentary election. I was momentarily overtaken by a welling pride that the brave military men and women of my country, the United States of America, had made that vote possible.

I also noticed each of the five had a glint in his eyes that only comes with the personal dignity attained by being free. A dignity for so long missing, swept away by the brutal regime of Saddam Hussein. A man who killed more than a half-million Iraqis and who, along with his two sons, subjected the entire Iraqi people to a 35-year reign of terror.

These five Iraqi men were lucky they could vote here in the U.S., away from the murderous actions of the so-called “insurgency.” Those still in Iraq were not so lucky. They had to risk their very lives to exercise a right and privilege we in the U.S. often ignore. But to the surprise (and disappointment) of many, they did just that. They bravely defied death threats and, in huge numbers, went to the polls. They figuratively thrust their purple fingers into the eyes of the terrorists.

And how do the supposed leaders of the “party of the people” characterize the Iraqi election? By sardonically calling it “democracy at the point of a bayonet.” No, not the bayonet or sword the terrorists use to cut off the heads of innocent people but the bayonet that helped secure that democracy. To these critics, democracy is only legitimate if it somehow just happens. History provides absolutely no example of democracy just happening: Great sacrifice is required to achieve it.

You would think the party that whined so loudly when voting lines during the 2004 U.S. elections were a bit long would at least grudgingly support the Iraqi risking their lives to vote.

Instead, all comment was reserved only to condemn those who made the election possible. No condemnation for the terrorists, only for a U.S. president who believes sowing democracy is the best way to protect his and the other countries of the world. They offer denunciation of the terrorists’ threats to dissuade Iraqis from voting, but any chance to vilify American soldiers is embraced with relish and venom. They have even derided the Iraqi voters by portraying them as dupes who will be easily tricked into voting against their own self-interest and elect an Islamofacist government.

Not only do these “leaders” not want us to win, they have already declared all is lost. Unbeknownst to our soldiers in Iraq, it has been declared they are “broken” and “cannot win.” It is U.S. soldiers, not the “insurgents,” who are “terrorizing Iraqi women and children.” This of course is said “in support of our troops.” Forget that the troops claim such rhetoric hurts morale, emboldens terrorists, and further endangers Iraqis.

And do not think the great success of the Dec. 15 election will change any minds. The election will be used to further their empty claim we should “redeploy” (a k a cut and run) our forces out of Iraq. Their “logic” is that the terrorists, when no longer threatened by U.S. troops, will suddenly start acting civilized and discover the virtues of democracy.

That brings me back to my question of why the Democratic leadership wants us to lose in Iraq. I am afraid I just do not have an answer or at least one I will ever understand.

The pride I felt in seeing the purple fingers on those five Iraqi men in that 7-Eleven was not manufactured, it simply happened. It happened because of the selfless sacrifice of the American soldier. I cannot understand how that same pride would not well up in the heart of every American.

DAVID P. MCGINLEY

McLean, Va.

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