- The Washington Times - Friday, December 9, 2005

BEIJING — Hundreds of riot police armed with guns and shields have surrounded and sealed off a southern Chinese village where authorities fatally shot demonstrators this week, villagers said yesterday.

Although riot police often use tear gas and truncheons to disperse demonstrators, it is extremely rare for security forces to fire into a crowd — as they did in putting down pro-democracy demonstrations in 1989 near Tiananmen Square. Hundreds, if not thousands, were killed.

During the demonstration Tuesday in Dongzhou, a village in Guangdong province, thousands of people gathered to protest the amount of money offered by the government as compensation for land to be used in the construction of a wind power plant.

Police started firing into the crowd and killed several people, mostly men, villagers reached by telephone said yesterday. The death toll ranged from two to 20, they said, and many remained missing.

State press and television have not mentioned the incident, and both provincial and local governments have repeatedly refused to comment.



All the villagers said they were nervous and scared, and most did not want to be identified for fear of retribution. One man said the situation was still “tumultuous.”

A 14-year-old girl said a local official visited the village yesterday and called the shootings “a misunderstanding.”

“He said he hoped it wouldn’t become a big issue,” the girl said by telephone. “This is not a misunderstanding. I am afraid. I haven’t been to school in days.”

She added: “Come save us.”

Another villager said there were at least 10 deaths. Some reports put the death toll up to 20.

“The riot police are gathered outside our village. We’ve been surrounded,” she said, sobbing. “Most of the police are armed. We dare not go out of our home.”

“We are not allowed to buy food outside the village. They asked the nearby villagers not to sell us goods,” the woman said. “The government did not give us proper compensation for using our land to build the development zone and plants. Now they come and shoot us. I don’t know what to say.”

One woman said an additional 20 persons were wounded.

The number of protests in China’s vast, poverty-stricken countryside has risen in recent months as anger comes to a head over corruption, land seizures and a yawning wealth gap that specialists say now threatens social stability. The government says about 70,000 such conflicts occurred last year, although many more are thought to go unreported.

Like many cities in China, Shanwei, the city where Dongzhou is located, has cleared suburban land once used for farming to build industrial zones. State media have said the Shanwei Red Bay industrial zone is slated to have three electricity-generating plants — a coal-fired plant, a wave power plant and a wind farm.

Shanwei already has a large wind farm on an offshore island, with 25 turbines. Another 24 are set for construction.

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