- The Washington Times - Thursday, February 3, 2005

Super alternatives

Couldn’t care less whether the New England Patriots or the Philadelphia Eagles emerge triumphant this Super Bowl Sunday?

Well, it’s lucky we live in an era of more channels than we could ever hope to watch. Several have planned some very un-football like fare to keep the pigskin-challenged happy.

TBS elects to run “The American President” at 8 p.m., a rewarding romantic comedy which imagines an unmarried commander in chief (Michael Douglas) trying to date while in office.

Over at Bravo, the “Queer Eye” guys work overtime as part of a marathon makeover session starting at 1 p.m. TNT gets into the marathon game as well with a skein of “Charmed” episodes starting at 2 p.m.

The Animal Planet offers the fluffiest fare, a three-hour special devoted to puppies dubbed the “Puppy Bowl.” The special, which trots out some seriously cute canines thrown into a tiny football stadium, airs at 3 p.m.

Inspired programming

The new Inspiration Network celebrates Black History Month with four new “I Gospel” programs throughout February.

The first of the four specials airs at 10:30 p.m. tomorrow and features singer Alicia Williamson and singer Rev. Robert Lowe discussing gospel music past, present and future.

The program features recognized singers such as Troy Ramey, Tommy Ellison and the Mighty Clouds of Joy, plus today’s solo artists such as Donald Lawrence, Maurette Brown Clark and Smokie Norful.

The latest ‘Confessions’

HBO’s ribald “Taxicab Confessions” returns this weekend for a new round of guilty eavesdropping.

“Taxicab Confessions: New York, New York” marks the first time the series has been in the Big Apple in eight years, Associated Press reports.

The show rigs a series of taxis with tiny cameras to record the real-life customers and their chatter with the respective drivers.

This edition, which debuts at 10:15 p.m. tomorrow, includes nine rides, with fare game including a young man and his blond transsexual girlfriend boasting about their steamy love life and a newly single man who talks about the woman he recently broke up with. The documentary also strikes a somber note when one passenger recalls witnessing the World Trade Center attacks and her relationship with a firefighter who survived it.

Post-‘Friends’ gig

“Friends” co-creator Marta Kauffman isn’t resting on her considerable laurels.

Miss Kauffman has signed on with The WB to help create an untitled one-hour pilot, Reuters News Agency reports.

The comedy-drama, written by “Sex and the City” scribe Liz Tuccillo, revolves around four adult sisters who navigate career, romance and relationships in New York.

In other development news, ABC has given the green light to two comedies: an untitled project about thirtysomething singles dating in Philadelphia; and “Adopted,” about a twentysomething guy who must deal with his two very different mothers.

In the Black

Comic Lewis Black is bringing his acid tongue to series television, Reuters News Agency reports.

Mr. Black, a regular on Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show,” has inked a development deal with producer Sony Pictures Television to star in a series built around his cantankerous stage persona.

Mr. Black is currently touring the country with his dyspeptic act and will soon release a book of humor dubbed “Nothing’s Sacred.” His HBO stand-up special “Lewis Black: Black on Broadway” also hits DVD shelves shortly.

He previously starred in a comedy pilot that was in consideration at ABC this past development season.

Compiled by Christian Toto from staff and wire reports.

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