- The Washington Times - Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Rhapsody in blue

“There’s a beauty in our coming together, there’s a beauty in our time together, and there’s a beauty in this, for us.”

That’s Brad Pitt rhapsodizing in GQ magazine about the end of marriage to Jennifer Aniston.

“I’m actually really proud of us. … We’ve done it our way, and I love her for that. We’ve kept the love we have for each other,” he told the magazine, on newsstands Friday.

Mr. Pitt, who didn’t explicitly deny an affair with Angelina Jolie in the interview, described the reasons for the couple’s breakup as “complex and multifaceted” and “not one thing.”

He dismissed the theory that his marriage foundered on Miss Aniston’s refusal to have children, saying, “That was one version.”

Yet he emphasized, as he has done frequently in the recent past, his desire to eventually start a family: “I’ll make it happen. You go make the thing that you want.”

Big-C scare

Australian singer Kylie Minogue has been diagnosed with breast cancer and will undergo immediate treatment, forcing her to cancel an upcoming tour.

A statement from Miss Minogue’s management team said the 36-year-old pop star’s diagnosis was confirmed this week during a visit to the southern Australian city of Melbourne.

“I’m just hoping and praying because the doctors found it so early that everything will be OK,” said Michael Gudinski, head of the company that is promoting the singer’s tour.

Lost in Nashville

The thief who stole a 10-foot-tall Elvis Presley guitar sculpture from Nashville’s Music Row ain’t nuthin’ but a hound dog as far as irate fans are concerned.

A $3,000 reward will be offered for the culprit’s arrest unless he or she returns the sculpture by Friday, according to Reuters News Agency.

One of more than two dozen individual fiberglass Gibson guitars displayed throughout the city as part of a “Guitartown” art project, the oversized instrument featured a painting of Mr. Presley on the front and the words “Heartbreak Hotel” arrayed down the neck. It vanished Monday from its stand in front of the RCA building.

Henry Juszkiewicz, chief executive of Gibson Guitars and sponsor of the project, was dismayed.

“If the sculpture is returned by Friday, no questions will be asked and nobody will be punished,” he said. “It is in the best interest of everyone in Nashville to help us locate this missing sculpture, which was produced by local visual artist Alan Rhody and hours of tireless volunteer work.”

Warren’s commission

Dick Tracy isn’t on his way to movie theaters — at least not any time soon.

Associated Press reports that Warren Beatty wants to make a new movie featuring the comic book detective but has been thwarted by Tribune Media Services, which claims control over Tracy’s character.

Mr. Beatty, in response, has sued the Chicago-based company for $30 million, saying Tribune violated a complex agreement regarding the Tracy rights.

Mr. Beatty’s lawyer, Bertram Fields, said the actor’s original agreement with Tribune was negotiated specifically to allow the 68-year-old actor a chance to make another Tracy film.

“It was very carefully done, and they just ignored it,” he said. “The Tribune is a big, powerful company and they think they can just run roughshod over people. They picked the wrong guy.”

Young MC

Neil Young was honored with the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Founders Award on Monday.

In his acceptance remarks, the 59-year-old rocker declared his love for rap music, Reuters reports.

“Most things I soak up, and it comes out here and there, so keep your eyes peeled,” Mr. Young said to laughter among the black-tie audience at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif.

“Anyway, I guess my mission now is to boldly go where no hippie has ever gone before.”

Compiled by Scott Galupo from Web and wire reports.

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