- The Washington Times - Saturday, November 19, 2005

The following is an eyewitness account from Nov. 20, 1945, by Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Louis P. Lochner, who covered the Nuremberg tribunal for the Associated Press. Mr. Lochner died in 1975 at age 87:

NUREMBERG, Germany (AP) — They were no longer glamour boys strutting across the European stage, these 20 Nazi leaders who filed today into the crowded Nuremberg courtroom.

Hermann Goering, without his medals dangling on his chest and the bejeweled marshal’s wand which he flashed at adulating crowds, didn’t seem to be Goering.

Julius Streicher, no longer in a brown uniform and no longer dealing out blows with a riding switch, did not seem to be the real Streicher.

Joachim von Ribbentrop, unattended by the retinue of Foreign Office flunkies in SS uniforms who handed him state papers before his theatrical speeches as foreign minister, looked again like the champagne merchant he once was — only now he looks too old and spent to inspire the confidence of a prospective customer …

The enigma for me was Rudolf Hess. Is he partly demented as claimed? Are his seeming indifference and alleged failure to recognize old friends simulation or reality?

From the moment Hess took his seat between Goering and von Ribbentrop until the court’s formal opening, Hess seemed utterly indifferent to what was going on about him. He appeared to stare into vacant space. But while others watched the presiding judge listening to opening statements, Hitler’s former deputy carefully scanned the press section and spectators’ gallery.

Later, during the reading of the indictment, at the first mention of Hitler’s name he pulled Goering by the sleeve and told him something with a smile and an emphatic nod of the head. This elicited no response.

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