- The Washington Times - Tuesday, September 27, 2005

Porn culture

“Part of the rhetorical force of the porn industry is the way it has insinuated itself into the ideals of progressivism and the defense of civil liberties. To speak against it is to be ‘pornophobic,’ or to engage in sexual correctness. Of course, the way the pro-porn industry makes its case by foreclosing the very possibility of argument is itself an egregious example of political correctness. …

“What does it say about the shrinking ambitions and declining seriousness of contemporary liberalism that [Hustler publisher] Larry Flynt is lionized as a civil-rights leader?”

—Thomas S. Hibbs, writing on “Rated X,” in the Oct. 10 issue of National Review

Name shame

“This personification business applied to disaster has gone too far. It affords the anchors too much elan to refer to ‘Rita’ as if she were a girlfriend waiting out in the car. The moniker ‘Rita’ is especially abhorrent because it reminds adult males of one Rita Hayworth, the ‘Love Goddess’ of a score of forgettable movies (and a couple worthwhile). …

“Stop maligning the memory of Margarita Carmen Cansino, the 5-foot-6 Brooklyn dancer who as Rita Hayworth made strong men weep. (And married five of them.) …

“Let’s find some designation less personal than names of real people as markers for what are after all impersonal acts of nature. …

“The zephyr of the real Rita will waft through aging hearts long after the imposter leaves.”

—Reid Collins, writing on “Stop Already,” Friday in the American Spectator Online at www.spectator.org

Not so chic

“If rumors that a model has a coke habit no longer raise an eyebrow, photos of her mid-binge apparently do. … [T]he U.K.’s Daily Mirror published grainy camera-phone stills of supermodel Kate Moss perched on a leather couch in a London recording studio, allegedly chopping and snorting multiple lines of cocaine with the quick sureness of a practiced user. …

“It’s an open secret that models dabble in drugs, particularly cocaine. … This emaciated look is what the fashion industry demands of its models, so the policy toward methods of weight loss has generally been don’t-ask-don’t-tell. …

“Arguably the world’s most famous supermodel (her sloe-eyed visage is on almost every other page of fashion magazines), and a frequent tabloid presence (she’s been involved with Johnny Depp, Evan Dando, Leonardo DiCaprio), Moss is a genuine celebrity. She is not paid just to be a pretty clotheshorse, but also to bestow on a product her glamorous aura. …

“The irony is that the rumors of bad behavior, the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle, have always been part of Moss’ allure. For years, the fashion world has courted, and profited from, her edgy, bad-girl image and her gaunt, post-hangover looks. It was Moss, in fact, who ushered in the controversial ‘heroin chic’ look … in 1990. … As it happened, the appearance of drugged-out chic was acceptable; the reality was not.”

—Amanda Fortini, writing on “Kate Moss,” Friday in Slate at www.slate.com


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide