- The Washington Times - Wednesday, September 7, 2005

One of Western art’s greatest revolutions was printmaking, or the replicating of works and pictorial images, in 15th-century Europe. Now the National Gallery of Art, in cooperation with the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nuremberg, Germany, presents 146 of the finest examples from this revolution in Origins of European Printmaking: Fifteenth-Century Woodcuts and Their Public. Works range from the sympathetic “Saint Jerome Removing a Thorn from the Lion’s Paw” (c. 1430), one of the earliest woodcut-on-paper versions of this subject, to the dramatic “Legend of Oedipus,” one of the first textiles printed in Europe. At the National Gallery of Art, Constitution Avenue at Fourth Street NW. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, noon to 6 p.m. Sundays through Nov. 27. Free. 202/842-6176.

— Joanna Shaw-Eagle

Though no longer a timely arrival — and conceptually an afterthought — Saraband finally appears after a month’s postponement, allowing admirers of Ingmar Bergman to catch up with the great filmmaker’s recent output. His 20-year retirement from directing theatrical features was terminated by this 2003 project. Shot in a high-definition video format, “Saraband” recruited Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson to revive their characters from Mr. Bergman’s celebrated TV serial of the early 1970s, “Scenes from a Marriage.” The original mismates, who divorced long ago, are now deployed as bystanders to a sinister relationship between a father and daughter played by Borje Ahlstedt and Julia Dufvenius, whose closeness and solitude portend dire consequences. The Freudian torment is not exactly fresh, but Mr. Bergman remains a spellbinder while accentuating confessional rants and breakdowns. Exclusively at the Cinema Arts, Landmark Bethesda Row and Landmark E Street Cinema.

— Gary Arnold

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